Word Challenge: K

Please contribute your own choices for words beginning with ‘K’. Foreign languages are welcome, with translation, and American spelling are allowed.

Kinetic.
This word always makes me think of psychic telekinesis, or robots. The ability to move objects with the power of your mind, (questionable of course) or the application of science and technology to move something. Yet is is an Ancient Greek word, and simply means movement, and the energy displaced by something moving.

Kibosh. (Kyebosh)
A slang word of undecided origin, and one that has become accepted into modern language, and dictionaries too. Meaning to bring an end to something, or a halt. The phrase, “Well that’s put the Kibosh on that” was used regularly by my father, and so became part of my own vocabulary as a youngster.

Kindred.
This started out to describe a person’s close family, and was often abbreviated to ‘Kin’. It fell out of use in modern times in the UK, until being widely used in the term ‘Kindred spirits’. I like that a lot, as it suggests a group who have the same ideas, likes, or aspirations. Many bloggers are indeed kindred spirits, so it is eminently suitable for this post.

75 thoughts on “Word Challenge: K

  1. Though I grew up canoeing Ozark streams, I very briefly owned a KAYAK. I’m surprised no one mentioned KIWI. Maybe everyone thought that one was for the birds…? As a Missourian, I’m very familiar with the town of Knob Noster. Here’s the origin of the town’s name, as quoted from their official website.

    According to historical information, the name Knob Noster is taken from the hills. Knob, meaning the hills, and “noster”, being the Latin derivation meaning “our”, were formed together to create “Our Knob”, or Knob Noster.

    So, I’d like to shout out to the Silent K, and go with KNOB!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Good Morning Pete:
    “KICK IT OUT” or sell short to long or the reverse (I never can remember which, so I never do it) is a novel economic term that starts with K. I suppose that puts a Kibosh on holding the equity in question. Lord Maynard KEYNES is perhaps the paramount economic K author, after Adam Smith of course. While it is a stretch, I feel as if he were a kindred spirit to me. I would close with KAFFIRS (South African Gold Mining Stocks sold on the London Exchange) which take almost kinetic thoughts to get them to move the way one wants.
    Warmest regards, Theo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Theo. That’s an interesting definition of Kaffirs that I had never seen before. It is generally a rather rude term for a black African person, used by white South Africans. I believe it is an Afrikaans word. Its use for mining stocks was news to me. Margaret Thatcher was supposedly a fan of Keynesian economics, so enough said about that. ๐Ÿ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. You grabbed a great one with kibosh, Pete. Here are three – and yes, the first one I certainly looked up:
    “kakorrhaphiophobia” – fear of failure. Or the fear of never being able to spell or pronounce this word
    “Knockwurst” – a short, plump sausage originating from northern Germany – and delicious
    “Khartoum” – the capital of Sudan, and the name of the horse from “The Godfather” – you remember, the one that ended up, partially, in the move mogul’s bed? And yes, Pete, the head was real!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I knew about the horse but had no idea of its name, although I read your post. I must have forgotten it. Knockwurst is a tasty sausage indeed, and delicious with German mustard. As for fear of failure, I won’t even attempt to replicate that spelling, and just say “Thanks”.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Kind – to be kind makes life much more easier. ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Knocking (on wood) – I’m not suspicious, but sometimes I knock on wood three times for luck. ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Kingfisher – to photograph one of this exciting and beautiful birds is one of my dreams.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. KItchen. Both its common meaning and also in African-American usage for the little scraggly hairs at the back of your neck. Kook. This seemed to be thrown about a lot with me and my siblings. Kangaroo. Just a great mouthful.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Dear Pete
    a German word I love is knutschen meaning kissing.
    Dina calls me sometimes Knutschpuppi means something like darling.
    A word that’s used quite often nowadays is Kollateralschaden – quite similar in English: collateral damage.
    Happy Sunday evening
    Klausbernd ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Kaboodle is a joy so I’ll give you Kit as well. I’ll give you KangerTech because I ran out of the Cretan cigarettes nearly four weeks ago. (Ok, that’s cheating but I wanted you to know.) Lastly, Kumquat because it’s another of those words that are luscious to pronounce. x

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks! I’ve been using it all this time and not smoking very many actual cigarettes but for nearly four weeks, it’s been an entirely vape-centred life which is very pleasing to me. And there have been stressful instances that could have derailed me. x

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Khaki: a colour that sounds a bit like it looks (and actually a colour I like wearing)
    Kaylied: Yorkshire word for ‘drunk’ not that I ever am, of course, unlike some friends of mine…
    Kitsch: I’m sure we all love a bit of kitsch ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My uncle was a former regular sailor in the navy, and always used Kaylied to refer to being drunk. He was from London, but had served on ships with many northerners. It is definitely a word mostly found north of The Wash. The German word Kitsch is so useful to describe sentimental tat!
      Best wishes, Pete. x

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Khazi is a new one for me, interesting!
    My grandfathers, who’d both been in the army, used “Khakis” as a noun, to mean tan cotton trousers (I did remember not to use “pants” when writing to a British person)
    I also didn’t know “Kibosh” was British, it’s still used in the U.S. a bit. I automatically assumed it was originally Yiddish, but when I looked it up, apparently that’s only one of many possibilities.
    But I’m safe with three Yiddish insults.
    Klutz (a clumsy person),
    Kibbitz (to second-guess, offer unsolicited opionions, and generally stick your nose in, without taking responsibility for the results).
    And Kvetsh (to indulge in extravagant whining as an art form)

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Those Yiddish terms are familiar to me, as I spent a lot of time in Jewish areas of London. They are not commonly used outside of that community though. Nice additions, Robert. I have heard ‘Khakis’ used to refer to army uniforms, as my Dad was once a regular soldier. However, we would normally use it to refer to colour, and add a word, as in ” A khaki shirt”.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, GP. Interesting that you independently selected two of the same words as chuq, who is also American. Over here, we use Knell to denote the sound of a bell. That sound may well be considered to be an omen by some.
      I enjoyed your clever construction, as always.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Knave is a lovely old English word, chuq.
      Kiosk has so many uses, including a telephone box, in Britain. It derives from the ancient Persian word ‘Kus’, meaning an open pavilion. Later changed by the Turks to ‘Kosk’. (I only know that because I considered using it myself. ๐Ÿ™‚ )
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. “Karzy” —- I am very careful to try to avoid using the public Karzy unless I am carrying hand sanitizer with me. Karzy is a lavatory or toilet in some areas of the world. It is kind of a slang or colloquial term or maybe even a regionalism if you want to inspect the significance of it most closely.

    Liked by 2 people

          1. So I am assuming that a “Loo” that is not up to standard might be referred to as a “Loopy Loo” and there there are two of them you might invoke the use of the word combination, “Loo-Loo” as in “Lulu?” LOL

            Liked by 1 person

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