Blogging contacts

I have had a ‘musical interlude’ this week, and have been posting about quite a few songs once again.

But I have also been thinking about blogging of course, and in particular the way it has enabled me to contact complete strangers, people I would never have met otherwise.

I receive quite a few emails asking me questions about living in Norfolk. People who are thinking of relocating here often discover my blog when researching places to consider living in. Just yesterday, I was contacted by a lady from the London area, who is hoping to move to this region in the near future. I was able to offer her some thoughts about life in a rural location, and its positives and negatives, as well as suggesting some suitable places for a non-driver to live in Norfolk. We exchanged a few emails, and she thanked me for my time and consideration. Just a small thing of course, but something that would never have happened without blogging.

On a similar theme, I received an enquiry from a couple in the north-west of England last year, also about living in Norfolk. After various emails between us, they moved here, and settled in the north of Norfolk, quite close to the coast. They then kindly invited me to come up and see them in their new home, something I plan to do in the future. Another chance contact that would never have been possible, if they had not read my blog.

Through blogging, I have not only met people from all over the world, I have also become involved in some of their lives, to varying degrees. I have reviewed their books, promoted their blogs or endeavours, and received the same favours in return. I am lucky to have been invited to visit them, and stay with them in far-flung lands or places more familiar, if I ever get the chance to do so. Many have become close friends via email, though we will probably never meet. In some cases, I know as much if not more about their lives than most people I meet physically every day in Beetley.

I often use the terms ‘blogging community’ and ‘blogging friends’. Both are very true, and real to me. This small community has endured for over five years, those friendships have developed during that time, and continue to flourish. If you are undecided about becoming a blogger, or unhappy with the way your blogging experience is turning out, then just carry on. Eventually, you might well enjoy the richness of knowing so many good people, and feeling as if you have genuine contacts, all over the world.

48 thoughts on “Blogging contacts

  1. So true. Blogging is amazing for how it brings such different people together. No matter where we are in the world we can connect with others who share our interests. I’ve come into contact with so many awesome people this way that I would never have known otherwise.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It is a unique opportunity, being able to interact with people regardless of distance. I’m particularly grateful because in a world so full of stories, it’s sometimes difficult to find someone else who knows a specific story, and welcomes the opportunity to discuss it. Through posts and comments, we find a wealth of conversational opportunities, all waiting patiently for someone to strike up the band once more.
    It’s even more refreshing as mainstream online networking seems to gradually shift away from substantive correspondence, preferring quick little remarks, or more often, emojis. Granted, likes and laughs have their place, but so do long conversations that really delve into the meat of how someone thinks and “why” they have a specific opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Indeed, it is high time you put up a post mate!
      If I hadn’t met you, I would never have become fascinated with composting toilets, or known anything about the Polish postal system, or have been able to use those great soaps…
      By the way, I tried chucking a bag of compost down our toilet recently, but it only blocked it up. πŸ™‚
      Cheers, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Totally agree with all you say, Pete. As you know I’ve been on holiday (came back early because our cat ran away from my sister, but that’s another story) and I’ve not been on social media but have missed reading the blogs I follow and chatting with bloggers around the world. I started my Goldfish blog to write about caring for Dad when he had dementia and have met so many people who are or were in a similar situation or just starting out on the same journey. It’s been great to feel connected. I really need to start a different blog because I want to keep the Goldfish one separate.
    I’ve met some lovely people, made genuine friendships and have been lucky to never meet the trolls and nasties out there.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Mary. Sorry to hear that you had to shorten your holiday because of the escapee cat. Hope that worked out OK.
      Glad to hear the story behind how blogging worked for you. I have been very happy to meet you through us both being bloggers.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thankfully, we have her back home though it’s been a traumatic few days. I think she was fed up because my sister didn’t actually spend any time with her but just put food down. Bandit decided she was going back to find her previous owner (who emigrated to New Zealand after the Brexit vote) but discovered the house occupied by dogs and a large python. She took up residence at the back of an agricultural engineers. The neighboorhood kids spotted her and alerted us, the Cat Protection charity lent us a trap which we filled with tuna and it worked! She’s been stuck to me like glue since she came home. We had offered a reward on the posters we put up and gave it to the kids who spotted her (and then did door to door enquiries) and tonight I was in tears when they put a hand made thank you card and drawing through our letter box saying they were so glad she was back safely.
        I’m not sure how we actually ‘met’ though I know we both follow Sarah and Sue. However it happened I’m glad it did and I’ve enjoyed learning about places I’ve never visited.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I agree with you wholeheartedly. There are many places I won’t ever see, but I am getting to know from reading others. People’s regular lives and thoughts continue to intrigue me. And I appreciate the general civility I find here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This particular WP community is indeed very civilised, polite, and respectful. I have seen all sorts of awful stuff on some other WP sites though, with trolling, spiteful comments, and terrible swearing. Perhaps us like-minded ‘nice people’ gravitate to the same company? πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. You have mentioned many times that a successful blog takes regular posts and responding to others. If you don’t comment and only like, you’ll never get the chance to exchange thoughts and feel connected. You do this very well, better than anyone, so it’s no surprise to me to see you have almost 2,000 followers and to hear you mention you spend hours talking to your buddies around the world each day. Good for you, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, John. Just think what I would have missed, if I had never met you! Bacon hats, madcap Japanese, Sushi backpacks, and burgers as big as a small car. Not to mention a wealth of wonderful exploitation films, and some sumptuous restaurant feasts enjoyed vicariously. Blogging rules!
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks Pete, and I never would have met Ollie, visited your beautiful countryside, or known about your extremely close brush with death at a young age – and so much more, especially your short fiction – “blogging rules” indeed!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Wonderful Pete. πŸ™‚ I think of blogging like having pen pals from all over world. I don’t have nearly the number of followers as you, still I like looking a the stats that show visits to my blog from US, UK, Argentina, Romania, Israel, Sweden, Germany, Italy, Brazil, etc.. thanks for sharing your perspective and for the continued encouragement to stay with it!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Susanne. I would take those 2100+ followers with a proverbial pinch of salt, as few ever read posts, or comment. However, the 200 or so who come and go, and those 50 or more who never fail to comment on one post or another, they are my real ‘community’ here.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

        1. That’s true. You have got me thinking now, Marina…
          Hmm, lots of mosquitoes though. There’s always something to complain about, if you think hard enough. πŸ™‚ ( I am English, after all )
          Best wishes, Pete.

          Liked by 1 person

    1. I do have one blogging friend who actually works at the end of our street. I have yet to arrange to meet her, but it has been discussed. Some of my dog-walking neighbours read my blog, and we discuss it on dog-walks.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

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