Global Warming: The British Isles

I have been on and off the fence for years, regarding Global Warming, or Climate Change, if you prefer. I am still not as fired up as some of those who write about the subject, but in recent years, I have started to credit the evidence of my own eyes, rather than to continue to read the sometimes rather hysterical reports that abound on the Internet. Some parts of eastern Norfolk are already quite literally falling into the sea. Tidal changes, raised sea levels, and erosion of soft rock are making ‘life at the edge’ no longer possible, in a few communities.

I found this image online, a gloomy prediction of the near-future for Britain and Ireland.

As you can see, Beetley is under water, along with much of eastern England. London has disappeared, and many large coastal communities no longer exist. And the prediction is that this will all have happened by the year 2100, just 81 years in the future. I am unlikely to live to see this of course, as I would be 148 years old.

But just in case medical science has managed to keep me alive that long, please don’t expect any blog posts from me that year.

Unless they have also invented underwater computers.

60 thoughts on “Global Warming: The British Isles

    1. It is the same in many countries, including Bangladesh and India. Disastrous floods every year since I can remember, yet they rebuild, and continue to live in the same place. Madness.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I think we can prepare for extreme flooding, and drought, though only in the countries that can afford to do so. But preparing for things like shifting tectonic plates, or the San Andreas fault snapping off is probably impossible. πŸ™‚ x
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I think global warming is a bit abstract for us humans to grasp, we never want to see the future, especially when its not a good one. Mind you we decided to build 300m up on a hill, just in case πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Well, my suitable for mummification friend from across the harbor, still always looking at the glass half empty, eh? Why not enjoy the real estate opportunity afforded you by one day having lucrative waterfront property? No need to thank me for my wisdom; your ire is reward enough.
    -Victor Lustig

    Liked by 1 person

  3. We have known about global warming for well over 3/4ths of a Century. Yet it continues for it is all about money. The Al Gore film, An Incontinent Truth, https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0497116/ does a fair job of explaining the money connection, but to put it simply (for an economist) it is all about not wanting to pay for the externalities https://www.bing.com/search?q=externalities+definition&form=EDGNB2&mkt=en-us&httpsmsn=1&refig=908f839da4524fb8d2f8330020dc40ca&sp=2&ghc=1&qs=EP&pq=externalities&sk=LS1&sc=8-13&cvid=908f839da4524fb8d2f8330020dc40ca&cc=US&setlang=en-US when the production of income produces collective goods like air pollution. Warmest regards, Theo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Theo. I have seen that Al Gore film. I suppose I content myself with knowing that I won’t be around.
      Selfish, perhaps. But I confess to not really caring that much. That is probably because I have no children.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I remember back in the eighties that it was said that Doncaster would be on the coast within 50 years! I thought that would be nice as I love living by the coast! A little early with the prediction though and going by this map poor old Donny is under water! And Cornwall a series of islands. Although where I live now feels like an island as it is very narrow between coasts. Head for the hills I have always said and it looks as though Wales and Scotland will rule supreme over us English!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Pete, it’s sad that here in the US the issue of climate change is political, not environmental, because we do need to prepare for a future where New Orleans is under three feet of water, and much of south Florida is as well…people think that some huge tidal wave is going to come, but it’s actually a slowly creeping push of water that will destroy houses one inch at a time…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree that the slow rise of water levels will probably do more damage than a tidal wave, John.
      I am 40 miles from the east coast here. so should have a few years left yet. πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. I have watched good bearing fruit trees go barren thanx to the weather……plus we are surrounded by water and in the Summer we get little rain……a decade a go there were rain storms almost every week day…….now not so….so yeh I believe something needs done as soon as possible….chuq

    Liked by 1 person

  7. We had a couple of hilarious holidays at Hoseasons holiday camp Hemsby when the children were young, perhaps that has been washed away as well. It is scary, you could get a houseboat to be on the safe side. I reckon we should commandeer ocean liners. You can read about the future 200 years hence in my novel Three Ages of Man!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I won’t be around to see it, whatever happens. The future generations will have to do their best to cope. Perhaps they will all have to emigrate to Africa, then see what kind of welcome they get. πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. On the one hand, the earth has historically gone through many climate cycles, and the tectonic plates are always on the move, often interacting at transform, convergent, and divergent boundaries. Erosion is also a natural phenomenon, and volcanic activity sometimes creates new land mass (as in Hawaii in recent years), or even new islands. On the other hand, it is likely that human civilization has contributed to, or even created, some of the changes we see in our climate and physical environment. I think there are many forces at work, some natural and some man-made.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Thanks for blogging this Pete, it is real and it is happening. As you know it’s something I write about and think about a lot. Amazing to see the map – and I also have seen many for what will happen to other countries around the world. Makes Brexit seem terribly irreverent doesn’t it? Unfortunately not Trump and his allies however who are speeding the process up with their nonsensical policies and ignorance on the matter. Seems that all the flooding and droughts and tornadoes going on over here in the US currently are happening in red country but those voters are not making the connection.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Reblogged this on Campbells World and commented:
    I wish there were a love button on WordPress. I’d have used it for this post.
    First, I like that the blogger has chosen to speak on what he sees with his own eyes. This shows that no longer can evidence be ignored. Next, I had to laugh when he wrote of how old he’d be when the event he writes of here takes place if it indeed does, and how he plans no blog posts that year unless under water computers have been invented. Since we’re on the cusp of both science having us live much longer, and we already have some under water devices, I’d say the chances of getting a blog post from him during the written of event are awesome.
    πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  11. What you have to remember Pete is that our east coast is made up from soft material (sand and clay). Therefore it is prone to erosion and flooding via the North Sea. I would argue that it has little to do with climate change so called…

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for your thoughts, Jack. As I said, I am not totally convinced, so still open to arguments on both sides. But the erosion around Hemsby is undoubtedly accelerating, even since I moved to East Anglia in 2012.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Every winter the North Sea changes our coastline. You have only been aware of it since 2012. I’ve known and experienced it for seventy-one years. Trust me, whats going on has nothing to do with global warming…

        Liked by 3 people

  12. I think it is about time we have to consider this seriously Pete. Didn’t you notice, our climates have been so unpredictable lately. We are having a very hot summer now, it was not like this before.

    Liked by 1 person

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