Writing letters

Since posting this in 2012, I hurt my hand a couple of years ago, and can no longer write comfortably. I still send letters though, but sadly they now have to be typed. Let me know if you still bother to write to anyone, in this electronic age.

beetleypete

When did you last write a letter? You know, get some paper, a spare envelope and a nice pen, and sit undisturbed, to write something to a friend , or relative. I appreciate that stamps are expensive these days, at least in the UK, though still a small price to pay for the value of personal contact, with some effort behind it. If you have ever received a letter, was it a good feeling? A nice change from circulars, bills, and charity requests, I bet. To imagine that someone actually bothered to think enough of you, to take the time out from a busy life, to contact you personally.

We live life electronically these days. Internet shopping, .com groceries, texts, e mails, and tweets. Facebook is the new and preferred method of keeping in touch, for an entire generation. An e mail or text can be sent to numerous recipients…

View original post 714 more words

43 thoughts on “Writing letters

  1. My father and I have exchanged letters for decades, since I was 17 years old. This last year, he became unable to write because of his health. How many times did he express with despair, “I can’t write letters … ” This even more than he complained about being unable to walk. Writing letters is a spiritual journey. Keep it up as long as you can.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I should forward your 2012 posting to our Chancellor. We have still not been able to arrive in the digital age here in Germany- at least officially, and for normal people. 🙂 Myself i use scanners and electronic communication since the mid of the 1990th. Since then i use email, no more paper. My handwriting looks like hieroglyphes. Lol Michael

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I still write and receive letters. It is too easy to forget an email. A letter can linger and be read and reread. As for handwriting, mine is atrocious. My grandfather’s was nearly unreadable, but I treasure all the letters he sent me.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I love letters. When sorting through the mail it is always a joy to receive a personal note or card. I am trying to get my grand kids to write letters. I provided the blank cards, the stamped envelopes, and the encouragement. We shall see what comes of it.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That’s a great thing to do for your grandchildren. I hope they get some early enthusiasm for such personal contact, and pass that on to their young friends too. Maybe a class project? 🙂
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is funny you mentioned class project. As I am a collector of cards, I often had my 150+ students write a card to someone. It might have been a note of appreciation for someone on staff, or a kind word to another student. It was all part of my devious (humor) plan to get them to communicate positively.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I so miss the letters from my grandmother and then my mother! A best friend who I’ve known since 5th grade still write me a long letter, at least once each year, and I love that. I’m not that good about handwriting letters back and often print them on the computer printer and just hand write my greeting and closing with signature. I do rely mainly on email and like hearing back right away:)

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I still correspond with two friends on a regular basis, though sadly have to type the letters now. I can understand how you treasured those from your mother and grandmother though, Becky.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. My own writing was never that good, but the letters could always be understood. I had a friend who wrote to me with what looked like hieroglyphs, and it would take me all day to ‘translate’ his writing.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. My last real letters were to Ted and Jody. My handwriting is something lower than chicken scratches, so I usually typed (keyboarded) them-that was sometime around 2015. Then the daily letters went by email once they got a device and they requested that form so they would get my Sunday missives on Sunday. Warmest regards, Theo

    Liked by 3 people

  7. i am never short of blank cards because i love to write notes, Pete. and yes, my cursive letters are still good. i’ve never written a letter for the longest time though 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  8. One of my creative pursuits in my younger days was calligraphy, I know, not the same as writing a letter, but I loved the old fashioned nib-pen and coloured inks, and learning copperplate, gothic script etc. I have some decorated poems on my wall that still look lovely, at least to me. I did have nice handwriting too, but it’s gone to pot these days, too lazy and careless after so much typing!! I did chuckle at your suggestion to pick up a pen and write a letter to someone important to me, I couldn’t think of anyone except the OH and I live with him!!

    Liked by 4 people

  9. Ah, Pete, I love to get letters, but rare in this day and age….and I can no longer write more than one or two sentences as my fine motor control and co-ordination are departing rapidly…but I do write the one or two sentences in a thank you card, and for a sympathy card I will insert a letter which has been typed but using a ‘handwriting’ font as I consider these occasions merit a few heartfelt words…..

    Liked by 4 people

      1. That’s nice to hear, Pete! Electronic communication is all well and good, but there are times when it doesn’t feel appropriate. And I am horrified when I hear of people being fired by email…..what is wrong with people that they can’t have the decency to talk face to face…..

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I have the same postman every day, but doubt that would find me. Though it might be nice to see if it did!
      I will happily give my address via email, to anyone who would like to write. My own email address is on the ‘About’ page. 🙂
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

All comments welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.