Waking Up To Winter

I woke up very early this morning, disturbed by the sound of gale-force winds, and the rain lashing against the bedroom windows. It took me a while to get back to sleep, but I managed it.

I didn’t surface again until almost 10 am, and might just as well have stayed in bed.

I know it’s not unusual to have rain here in June. Everyone knows that the weather in this month was just as awful as long ago as 1944, so no great surprise. And for those of you used to my seven years of weather moans, you will remember many June posts lamenting the absence of a summer in Beetley.

But this is torrential rain, and it has lasted for almost eighteen hours now. The addition of strong winds arriving yesterday increased the noise, and debris from the Oak trees is scattered all around the property. The chimney of the wood-burner is creaking as if it is about to tear away from its mountings, and various local dogs are barking at rattling gates and fences. The sky is best described as ‘threatening’, and the forecast is for more of the same, for the next eight days.

And it is cold. Yes, cold. And in June. Cold enough to put the heating on, but I flatly refuse to do that. Cold enough to mean that my shorts will have to be put away again, and Wellington Boots needed to replace more comfortable footwear. Midsummer’s Day is the 21st of June, so we don’t have long left before the evenings already begin to get darker. But it is 11:30 in the morning, and already dark enough to have lights on around the house.

I don’t ask for much, I really don’t. (OK, I know you think I do…)

But can we just have some summer, please?

76 thoughts on “Waking Up To Winter

  1. It’s a distribution problem, obviously — rain and wealth both. I can’t complain about our temperatures here on Vancouver Island (although I see 28 degrees C forecast for next week), but we could certainly use a 24 hour rain. No gale force winds with it though.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Well that sounds miserable Pete and sorry it will stick around for a few days. Those kinds of storms are bad enough in the winter but even worse when you’re expecting summer. We’ve had some cooling here but not much rain and hot weather is expected this week. So I’ll enjoy it while I can since you never know when it may turn again. We often say summer doesn’t really start here till after the 4th of July.

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  3. The day after I took the flannel sheets off our bed we had a record low for June. Now, fortunately, it is back in the 70’s(F) and very pleasant. Sadly since we had a very warm winter there are billions of mosquitoes.

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    1. I can never work out why they can’t save the water when it’s there. After months of rain, we often get a few hot days, followed by water-warnings. Just save the stuff, that’s what reservoirs are for! πŸ™‚
      The water companies here are notorious for ‘wastage’. Leaks account for countless millions of gallons a year. Then they put up our water bills, to pay for ‘renewing pipes’. Grrr!
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I have been to England and Scotland and Ireland enough over my life to know that I would never venture to your island in June. It’s always raining. That’s why your gardens and hillsides are so splendiferous! Sincerely, you should have retired in Spain. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I get fooled every year by expecting June to be summer. You know better than me, and I have lived here all my life. Ireland is a different matter. It is never that sunny over there. πŸ™‚
      The thing about Spain is that it is mostly ‘too hot’. But I could try to acclimatise…
      Best wishes, Pete. x

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  5. Same here Pete, I’m sitting in the conservatory with winter woolies on. 😦 It has stopped raining now though the sky looks ready to dump more, and forecast sun though still cold tomorrow, which is good as I’m off on an outing with Sophie and cameras. Oops here comes the rain again πŸ™„ should have kept schtum!

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    1. As I recall, the original cubit was measure from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger, so the length of the forearm and hand. That didn’t allow for craftsmen of different physical size of course, so was hardly a defined measurement. But I did know what a cubit was. πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I have to be honest, Becky. Over 90 is very unusual in the UK, so would be too much all the time.
      All I am asking for is a pleasant 70+, and no constant rain.
      As I said above, ‘I don’t ask for much’. πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Eight days is a long time for lingering weather patterns. Cold, wet weather does put a damper on summer. At least the temperatures have not dipped too low here during our rain. We are still holding at around 70Β° F.

    They now are predicting our rain might end Monday and not extend to the end of next week. Hope you will be as fortunate.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. So much for “flaming June” as it is supposedly called. We have the same here in the north, 24 hrs solid rain. Fingers crossed it is drying up later πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes indeed, Mary. Last summer spoiled me, reminding me of what summer should be like. πŸ™‚
      (Oh and I spoke to my plumber. He has a lot of work at the moment, but he’s seriously thinking about your offer. )
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. It’s cold and wet in Leicestershire too. And I’ve just realised that Beetley is a village and not some strange arcane name you’ve given yourself

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have always talked about Beetley being a place, but many people thought I had invented the name. Some thought it was to do with VW cars, others The Beatles. But it is noted on my ‘About’ page, as well as in many photo posts too. πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

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