Ambulance stories (13)

Another old ambulance post from 2012. My first baby!

beetleypete

It’s a boy!

When I did my training to become an ambulanceman, the maternity module was basic, to say the least. It consisted of a plastic pelvis and a woolen doll, with a placenta and umbilical cord (also in wool) attached. A short session of passing this through the pelvis at different angles was followed by an instructional film. This seemed to have been made in the late 1950’s, judging by the vehicles, and the clothing worn by the small cast. Using a willing female ‘star’ of a certain age, a real delivery in the back of an ambulance was filmed in glorious technicolour. It all went off well, with no complications, and ended with smiles all round.

There was some talk about breech births, cords around baby’s neck, and infant resuscitation, as well as pregnancy complications, like Pre-eclampsia, and placenta previa. This was added as information, as we were…

View original post 1,084 more words

18 thoughts on “Ambulance stories (13)

  1. “What you actually do is catch it as it comes out, and try to keep both baby and mum alive until you get them to hospital, or a midwife arrives to take over.”

    I think we need to redefine the term “catch and release.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I did later come across some very complex births, Sue. I did a couple of breech births, and some where I had to ‘root around inside’ to untangle umbilical cords. But it was mostly just ‘catching’. 🙂
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

All comments welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.