Of A Certain Age

You might have to be of a certain age to appreciate this post.
You might also have to be British, though some of this crosses international borders.

For those of you born after 1980, think of it as a History lesson.

Like listening to music?
No i-tunes back then, not even a soon-to-be-outdated CD to play.
This is how we listened to our music.

Cinema Snacks?
No hot dogs, or buckets of popcorn.
No Tacos, or Wraps.
No two-pint cups of unlimited Coca-Cola.
This was what we had to choose from, displayed during the intermission.

Fancy a Latte or Cappucino?
We didn’t have those then.
We didn’t even have powder or granule instant coffee.
We had this. You poured some of the syrup into your cup, and topped up with boiling water.

Playstation, or X-Box? What’s your favourite game?
How about this? It didn’t need a wireless controller.

Fancy something sweet?
How about a liquorice pipe?
Smoking was cool back then, and there were sweet cigarettes too.

Apps on your smartphone?
Instagram, Snapchat, or Facebook?
Maybe you enjoy just texting, with lots of emojis?
Try doing all that on one of these.

Enjoy Ice Cream?
Maybe you like Ben and Jerry’s?
What about flavours? Salted Caramel, or Cookie dough?
This was it, when I was 8 years old.

Foreign Food?
What’s your personal choice?
Pizza? Chinese, Indian, or Thai?
Mexican perhaps, or a nice Fusion.
This is what passed for exciting dining.
It was ‘boiled in the bag’.

Think about this, the next time you are enjoying a home-delivered pizza, watching your friend play Call of Duty as you listen to tunes on your phone.
Remember how lucky you are. πŸ™‚

104 thoughts on “Of A Certain Age

  1. You say remember how lucky you are but I loved growing up in the 80s. All those things you mentioned, i remember with great fondness. For all the technology now, and much of it is excellent and enhances our lives, i would go back to what i grew up without a doubt. Ian

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Ian. It was meant to be ‘ironic’, but I didn’t lay the irony on thick enough for that to come across. πŸ™‚
      Although I relish the Internet giving me the opportunity to be a blogger, I have nothing but fond memories of my youth in the 1960s.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I remember getting penicillin shots in the rear end when I had an ear infection. My grandchildren, who have had flavored liquid antibiotics in the past, thought I was making this up when I told them. Then there is the small pox scar on my thigh and the chicken pox scar on my forehead. Things they know nothing about.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yes, we had record players that played 45’s though the little plastic disc that fit inside wasn’t always reliable. The 33’s were the albums and you could stack them so when one finished the next one dropped and played. I even remember a few old 78’s! We also had a slide projector that you used along with an album for a multimedia presentation on a family night. πŸ˜‰ Very high tech!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Excellent I remember them all : sometimes you had to queue in the bitter cold outside the phone box , and I’ve seen people banging on the box in anger if someone was too long. Many times have I got to the box to find it vandalised and had to walk to the next available box.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have a confession to make, FM. Sometimes, I had to wait for so long outside a phone box, I had a to have a pee in it once I got in there.
      I know, shameful. But that’s how it was!
      Best wishes, Pete. πŸ™‚

      Like

  5. Pete, “boil in a bag” is now the hot cooking trend “sous vide”…and a friend who grew up in the South said to me once: “we pay so much for pork belly, but where I come from it was dirt cheap and called “fat back!” As for the record player, the first one I had was a “close and play”…the needle was on the inside of the lid!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Monsieur, I just went back to my grandfather’s time. We had a gramophone in the house, I don’t know cinema snacks back at that time but we have always had samosas. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚Indians. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ the coffee turned into powder but still, I use it and add boiling water. My family loves ludo, snakes and ladders and we hate call of duty types of games. The same cigarette chocolate is available in India but they are hard to find now that some people think it teaches children how to smoke and that’s bad. Believe it or not, my grandmother’s old boxes from the old bungalow has a phone exactly like that but it’s red in colour. My favourite ice cream is a cornetto of the most ancient ice cream company in India named Havmour. Packed food exists in India and is used by most of the bachelors even I have had it.πŸ˜ŠπŸ˜‚ it tastes disgusting. πŸ˜‚ still with the roots. I enjoyed this post. We want more.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I love walks down memory lane. Our brands and names might have been different, but the pictures show the treats were similar. The technology advances have definitely taken the place of more human interaction and to our children’s deficit I’m afraid. When our grandchildren visit, it’s funny how little they desire their techno-toys and enjoy just spending time together.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. My son took away YouTube privileges for his children. Not because they were abusing it, but because of the inability to control some of YouTube’s advertisements and suggestions. It is a shame.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Technology, I enjoy it. However, the price we pay for many things we lose, isn’t worth it.
    Privacy: Social Media has all but taken it from us. A camera in every phone.
    Memory: How many telephone numbers do you know by heart. Yet, many of us play “Brain Games” to keep our memories sharp?
    Stress: Ever watch someone that HAD to go without their phone for a day? It’s funny, and crazy.

    I love your memories Pete, those years were my favorite time.

    Want to cripple an entire generation? Remove Cellphones, Social Media, and bring back the stick shift.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Oh, wow! 😁 I was born in ’85’ and I am from the USA, lol. But I really enjoyed this post. I have seen the record player before. In fact, those are coming back. My 15 year old niece just got one for her birthday ( at her request).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your comment. Glad you enjoyed the post. πŸ™‚
      As I replied to a comment lower down, those record players are once again considered to be very fashionable.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  10. Oh, I don’t feel lucky at all! The games –it required children to use their imaginations. As far as food goes and the convenience of it, it’s all garbage and makes one fat. Better to cook at home. The technology is the coolest for me. Oh, why it has become necessary for us to have cell phones, I still hate them. I miss having one phone, one television in the house. Writing letters! I miss sending and receiving letters. How about that for some good old-fashioned negativity? πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

      1. I researched that very thing, and statistics show that book-reading is actually on the increase in the younger generation. Strange but true. Probably because they can read them on phones and Tablets, not sure.
        Best wishes, Pete. x

        Like

    1. My use of the word ‘lucky’ was ironic of course, Cindy. πŸ™‚
      What they have lost with all the technology is imagination. That’s the most valuable thing we possess as humans, I think. But it must be nurtured, not ‘supplied’ by others.
      (I hope you are OK, by the way.)
      Best wishes, Pete. x

      Like

      1. I’m fine. My granddaughter has moved in with us. She’s an angel and a surprise welcome addition to the household. A great help with the puppy, Ruby, who is a therapy dog for her. I don’t know about my mother yet. I’m flying to Illinois on Thursday. I will hear the results of the byopsy. That’s the hard one.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I remember the record player, my sister and I had one between us…but no records. Our parents would use… I remember all of the items but especially how bad camp coffee is. Still available but only with the awful chicory added. Ice lolly’s and vesta meals were such a luxury! As was a soda stream, not mentioned here but…I can remember thinking life would be so much better with a soda stream. Thank you for the little trip down memory lane!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Samantha. I actually never wanted a Sodastream, as we had my fizzy drinks delivered to the door by the ‘Corona Man’. πŸ™‚
      My favourite flavours were Dandelion and Burdock, and Cream Soda.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Oh, we didn’t have curries here of any description, Pete, although many of the other things were similar (with our own versions). Due to the political circumstances we were probably even more isolated than many other countries, but with the touristic boom we did get to see some things that were quite alien to us. We never had a phone while we lived with our grandparents, and we had to go to the neighbours or to a phone box. And what about typewriters? I was overenthusiastic and managed to smash the keys on the portable flimsy ones… What times… Thanks for the memories, Pete!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Olga. I had a lovely old Adler Typewriter in my bedroom. It was a mid-1930s model, and enormous! It was given away by my Mum’s employers when they upgraded to modern machines.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  13. I would say, I do know a lot of this stuff since in India technology, fashion and foreign food came a little later. So I had the same telephone, games and ice-creams as you, as a child.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. India is entering the technology quite fast now, maybe because a lot of it is developed in India or by Indians abroad. πŸ˜ƒ But yes, when I was a child thirty years back, it was not the case.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. I remember all of those πŸ™‚ My favourite ice lolly was a Mivvi. How exotic were those Vesta meals? It’s a wonder they didn’t put us off ever trying any foreign food. In those days spaghetti came in tins!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh yes. Phone calls were considered to be a real luxury, and generally only for real emergencies or something serious. All the numbers were stored in a flip-up device next to the phone. (When we finally got one at home) πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  15. I’d forgotten about Sky Rays! I loved them and Jubblys too. I could never use a public phone because I didn’t have the strength in my arm to push twopence into the slot. Mum always told me I could run around to the sweet shop and use theirs if I needed to call her at work during the school holidays. I only ever had to do that once.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Music memories….Cinema snacks here were bought in the Lobby….our pay phones were not so elegant….we still play board games…..we are just recently starting to get frozen foreign food other than Mexican….coffee has not gone far we still buy syrup to pour on the coffee for that Latte which 50 years ago NO one had any idea what it was…..that was fun…thanx chuq

    Liked by 1 person

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