Ollie At The Vet (Again)

Ollie had to go to the Vet again today. That’s why I am late posting my serial episode, (for those of you that noticed) and just running late in general. Any break in my fixed routine makes me feel that I lose the rest of the day trying to catch up.

Anyway, Ollie had to have his annual booster injection, and general health check. In addition, I was worried about a sore eye that was troubling him, and the fact that he just cannot seem to stop shedding hair out of season.

Excited to get in the car, he was less impressed after the 12-mile drive deposited him at the hated Vet. Not that he balks at going in, but once inside he shows obvious signs of distress about what may be about to happen. Luckily, there were lots of other dogs there already, so his attention was distracted. Two Golden Retrievers, a young Rottweiler, a barky Labrador, and a nervous Poodle all gave Ollie the eye as he came in, and there was a great deal of mutual sniffing. Only the trembling Poodle made sure to avoid my dog.

He weighed in at thirty kilograms. This is a one kilo increase on last year, and a two-kilo increase on his weight at the age of two. The Vet checked his heart, looked in his ears, and gave him the booster jab. Then he was examined around the eyes, as I talked about the never-ending moulting of fur. He had to have an ‘indicator solution’ dropped into the bad eye, and after a short delay, the colour change (to green) indicated Conjunctivitis. The issue with the fur was diagnosed as yet another yeast infection on the skin, causing the fur to constantly fall out and re-grow.

The treatment will be seven days of eye drops to clear up the right eye. The Vet agreed that we should avoid yet another dose of oral antibiotics and steroids for the skin, but has suggested weekly baths in the special shampoo for the foreseeable future. That in itself is going to be a mission, getting Olie in and out of our small corner bath, and trying to dry him off. I could take him to the groomer every week, but at £32 a time, that option is too expensive.

As he filled out the report on his computer the Vet also discussed Ollie’s age. He will be 8 years old in February. For a Sharpei, that is the human equivalent of 65 years of age, and is why he is slowing down more each month, and sleeping longer. He casually added, “If he sees double figures, I will be happy, but surprised”. I was shocked, and asked him if that was really true. Might Ollie only live for less than two more years? He shrugged. “The oldest one I have ever seen was ten years old. I have never seen one older than that. Too much in-breeding, I’m afraid.”

I paid the £60 bill, and we left. As I was driving home, I wondered if the Vet’s gloomy prediction could be correct.

Life without Ollie in it just doesn’t seem possible.

94 thoughts on “Ollie At The Vet (Again)

  1. From what I have read so far, you take good care of Ollie and he exercises too. So, He may live longer than expected.
    I lost my childhood dog to a terminal disease. The pain of that loss is a feeling I wish you will not feel, anytime soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My dad’s beloved dog, Billi died last week. She was 12. She was a complete mongrel so not breed specific but she just got really old. We’re all so sad but no one more so than my dad’s partner. Unfortunately it seems smaller dogs tend to live longer than larger dogs.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry to hear about your Dad’s dog. I think you are right, and small dogs do live longer.
      (It’s similar with people. Very tall people tend to die younger, on average.)
      Best wishes, Pete.

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  3. Nobody wants to hear that-but take heart, for dogs as well tended as Ollie, do outlive the odds often. I always have a boxer and the are not expected to live to ten. My last one lived to 14! I read that shelter and good food and a lot of love does make a difference. I am cheering for Ollie to surprise the vet! Michele

    Liked by 1 person

  4. So many factors at play here… Ollie is out and about a lot and it is likely the other dogs seen by the vet may have had lazy owners. Our vet was really surprised at how long our Boxer was with us and put this down to the amount of exercise he had.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. We had a shock last month when our terrier stopped eating and seemed dozy. We started to discuss what we would do if….Then he perked up and is now eating better than ever, although he still has to wear a nappy at night or he wets his bed. ( he’s almost 15) I’m afraid the bigger the dig the shorter their lives but all we can do is make each day as good as possible and you surely do that. I know we would be lost without a furry friend and just get an older one each time because we don’t want to out last them. We have had five dogs over the years and life tends to revolve around them.It is good that we face up to the fact that they will leave us at some time but it doesn’t stop us giving them all the love we can while they are with us. Be strong, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You never know Pete, Ollie is in good condition for his age and all you can do is put it to the back of your mind and enjoy every minute. Sam was a big dog and very hairy… we fixed up the hose to the mixer tap in the kitchen and had warm water coming through.. Sam was on his lead attached to the fence but it gave him more room than the bath and he actually enjoyed the process to the point that he would voluntarily deliver himself to the hose without being on the lead. Less messy and a good rub down with a towel and he would then happily go and roll around in the grass!

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  7. I am sorry for the news and I know what you mean….when Jaz died I was useless and Sue made me get off my butt and find a friend that would make me get off my butt. I hope the prediction is wrong chuq

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I have a file on my computer that gives me all the info on my furkids, but I never look at it. My mind is also very good at selective amnesia. I don’t want to remember how old they are, or how long they may have left. Like us, they have no guarantee of tomorrow so we all make the most of today. Hugs to Ollie.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If that works for you, then that’s a good plan. As I got Ollie when I retired at 60, we have grown old together, which perhaps makes me more aware of us both ageing.
      Best wishes, Pete.

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    1. Thanks, FR. Perhaps we will both outlive the predictions! 🙂
      (My GP in London told me if I didn’t take Statins, I would be dead before 60. The GP in Norfolk took me off them, and I have managed close to 8 years without dying.)
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. The flips side of having a pet is the expensive vet bills and the fact that they don’t live that long. It’s a trade-off I’ll make every time. One of my best friends, a life long dog owner, told me once, “I’ll trade a few weeks of sadness for the 10+ years he/she gave me. That might seem harsh, but it sums it up. My yellow labs are nine and six. The nine-year-old is slowing down, and arthritis is catching up with him. He is the best dog I’ve ever owned, so I don’t like thinking about him passing.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. This is the awful thing about having pets: it brings mortality close to home. I have recently been thinking that now I am getting too old for another dog or, at least, a dog that might outlive me. This, however, is an improvement on when I was younger and the kids had a procession of gerbils and other rodents whose sole purpose seemed to be to start the discussion about the temporary nature of life

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Alan.
      I have already discussed the prospect of not having another dog after Ollie. Even if I outlived that second dog, I might well be too old by then to be able to give it enough play and exercise.
      Best wishes, Pete.

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  11. My Brody has his appointment tomorrow. He has a hard time with other dogs when he is on a leash, so walking in to the office is sometimes tricky. I typically ask the vet to cut his nails, however they have to put a muzzle on him because although I don’t think he would bite, he sounds pretty darn mad when they grab his feet!
    The vet really should be more optimistic, especially with the good care you are giving Ollie. My last German Shepherd lived until she was 15!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Keep your hopes up Pete. Some dogs do do better than anyone could think. But I understand the vet too. It is awful to contemplate the ending of the life of a beloved pet. We’ve gone through it a lot as we are older, but it is horrible. Have some lovely last years with him Pete. And by the way, Ollie is a lovely name. Our new dog is calked Hope. You can guess why we chose that name

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Thanks, Lorraine. I can guess why your dog is called Hope. 🙂
          Ollie is named after Oliver Cromwell, a native of East Anglia, and a man responsible for beheading a king. All good in my book.
          His full name is Oliver Cromwell Johnson, Ollie for short. 🙂
          Best wishes, Pete.

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  12. Aw sorry to hear this update. That is the hard part about having a pet; they don’t last as long as we do. I hope you and Ollie enjoy everyday of your remaining years together. And who knows? Maybe Ollie will defy the odds and set a new record for Sharpei longevity!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. “Two Golden Retrievers, a young Rottweiler, a barky Labrador, and a nervous Poodle all gave Ollie the eye as he came in.” But Ollie only needed one for the eye that was sore, so I hope he gave the other four back.

    But, seriously, it seems the more joy a pet brings to one’s life the harder is to cope with the medical conditions that cause it great suffering, and the harder it is to face the inevitable loss of a great and loving companion. For now, let’s hope that Ollie recovers as quickly as possible, and that you make every day with him count. Quality of life trumps longevity.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I think most pedigree breeds have a fairly short life, 10 is a good age really. My Boxer lived to 12, but her last couple of years were not healthy. The most we can ask for is a healthy life for our pets and to give them a happy life however long, and you are certainly doing that for Ollie. Don’t fret, just enjoy your time with him.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. He is actually a very nice guy, and his parents live in the house behind us, so I see him around outside of ‘work’ too. But like most medical people, he has a tendency not to sugar-coat things.
      Thanks, Theo.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. As our four-legged life companions age, sigh, the vet visits get harder to take, even if all going well and no extras (like sore eyes and falling out hair) are present – – I do not know for sure, how old my beloved Oakley is – but she, too, is slowing down, and worries me here and there – a limp where one was before that is not injury or sticker or weight based – just tired joints and a need to navigate the surroundings more carefully, as she is losing her sight – sigh – sigh -sigh – I cannot imagine life without her, but also know, unless something massive happens, I will sometime in near future, have to live such a life – – hugs and hoping whatever time is left – 2 days or 2 years or more – that it contains the joy of bearable daily life for you and Ollie – for, in the end – it is all we ever really have with anyone, but with our pets, it is so often much shorter than the lifetime we would have gladly given them –

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Probably best for you AND Ollie – to do so – I came home from vet this past fall, rather down, but perked myself up within a day – she doesn’t have diabetes – she is happy, and in good shape (for her age) and the vet knows I can’t spring for eye surgery – and so – we will truck through the days ahead – side – by -side and prove ’em all wrong….right? 😀

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