Rise Up! : Sign Language Version

My step-daughter Emma works here in Norfolk in a school for children with special educational needs. Because of Coronavirus, she is currently working from home on teaching projects. She decided to use her sign language skills to help and inspire the kids at the school, many of whom have great problems with communication. She worked hard to create a sign language version of the popular and inspiring song, ‘Rise Up!’

I don’t normally make such requests, but on this occasion I am asking all of you, wherever you live, to share this blog post on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and on any other social media platform you are a member of.

Sign language is international. and so many people trapped at home during the current lockdown may be thrilled and inspired by Emma’s video. Let them know it will all be over soon, and that one day they will ‘Rise Up’ once again.

79 thoughts on “Rise Up! : Sign Language Version

    1. This is the You Tube .com link, from my own You Tube channel. If it isn’t working, it might be a copyright issue, depending where you live.
      I hope it works, but if not, thanks for trying.

      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Reblogged this on Writing Wrinkles and commented:
    The setpdaughter of Beetleypete from Norfolk, UK has translated the song ‘Rise Up’ into sign language for this video.
    (I’m guessing it is BSL as I faintly recognise some of it. What a shame there isn’t a universal sign language.)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Magical BookLush and commented:
    Let’s Rise up and support the video of Emma, a teacher in Norfolk in a school for children with needs of special education. She created a lovely sign language video of the song Rise Up. Tweet this, reblog this, do anything and everything you can to help her spread her lovely message. Come and join us in getting over this Pandemic difficulties.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. That is nice, I’m sure the children face the same as I do when someone starts talking I tell him/her “I cannot hear you I’m deaf.” Then they keep talking, lol, while I keep saying “What? I can’t hear you.” Now with face mask, I cannot read lips too well either. Bless the kids and your stepdaughter.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Very beautiful and inspiring Pete! Thank you for sharing.

    (Unfortunately I’m having technical difficulties trying to reblog and will log a case with WordPress. Clicking the button does nothing and I’ve tried all of my browsers.)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Inspirational, Pete. I’ve tweeted this, plus posted to Facebook and Linkedin. I may have to pick your brain or your step-daughter’s – on sign language. I’m writing a police procedural case story in six episodes – first appeared in February and second a week ago. A key character is deaf as is the detective’s sister, so I want to ensure the writing is as accurate as possible.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for all those shares, Roland. I am convinced many deaf and disadvantaged people will love this. Emma would be happy to help with your sign-language questions, but I don’t want to put her personal email online. Send me any questions you have, and I will forward them to her for her to reply.
      You should know that there are many sign languages, includind BSL and Makaton. Emma uses ‘Sign-along’, if that is of any use to you.
      Please use this emailaddress. petejohnson50@yahoo.com
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I understand about the email so will send questions via you – many thanks. My characters are in Wales, where there is Welsh Sign Language and BSL – plus others, probably. I’ve only mentioned BSL so far, but my rabbit-hole-mind will delve into the others, before I ask more.

        Liked by 1 person

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