Beetley and Covid-19: A Saturday Report

This week the focus has been more about the short heatwave, than anything else. In London, police tried to break up a street party in Brixton, sparking off a small riot during which twelve officers were injured. On the beaches of the south coast, hundreds of thousands of people congregated to enjoy the weather, with little regard to the continuing death rate, the possibility of spreading infection, or respect for social distancing.

One town (Bournemouth) declared a ‘state of emergency’ after almost 500,000 people swamped the beaches in just one day. Equally as ignorant was the unspeakable mountain of rubbish they left behind when they went home.

The hot weather brought crowds to the river bend in Beetley Meadows too. Mums and children playing in the cool water, picnics at the tables provided, and dogs enjoying splashing in the river. Well, when I say ‘crowds’, there must have been at least 25 people there one day.
But this is Beetley we are talking about.

Because my wife works at a Doctor’s Surgery, she had to have a Covid-19 antibodies blood test. This provides a fast result as to whether or not you have already had the virus, and now have evidence of that in your blood. Hers was negative, and it’s hard to say if that is good news, or not so good news. It just is what it is, she hasn’t caught the virus yet.

Shopping in town was remarkably quiet this week, as presumably everyone had made for the coast to enjoy the beaches. Boris made his announcements about reducing the 2-metre rule to 1-metre, and the reopening of pubs, restaurants, and hotels, from the 4th of July.

Some of us might think this is all still too much, too soon. Including me. Others might think us to be grumps and killjoys, or blind to the needs of the ecnonomy, especially the hospitality sector and holiday providers.

Perhaps they should ask the opinion of the families of the 1,114 people who died of the virus last week?

68 thoughts on “Beetley and Covid-19: A Saturday Report

  1. We’re venturing out tentatively to things like the playground in our local park but you won’t catch me on a popular beach or in the pub any time soon. Too busy working and definitely a bit anxious.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Here there is no state of alarm any longer, and things are going back to normal, although no large crowds allowed, shops have limits on how many people can enter, and places like theatres and cinemas (which are slowly reopening) have also restricted numbers (and museums). Many of the big events and parties have been cancelled or changed so they are run differently. But there is the odd focus of contagion, and the virus is still around (although numbers are much lower). We are all expecting it to come back in force, but we don’t know exactly when, although as the borders open, we shall see as well…
    I am also worried and not too optimistic about how things will evolve. The only hope is that we might be slightly better prepared, but, as you say, the relatives of those who have gone should be given a voice and perhaps others would not be so complacent. It’s not themselves alone at risk. They are risking everybody else’s lives.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. British tourists are allowed to visit Spain after the 4th of July, and there has been a record number of bookings. I hope that they behave themselves in your country, and don’t just get blind drunk and make a mess. I fear they will bring the virus with them though, so please be careful, Olga.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  3. It’s really horrible what’s going on here. I don’t want to blame people for wanting to go outside. But it is still dangerous to come close to someone with the virus. Here in Bavaria, a second wave is now being warned. But YOU still don’t get FFPII protective masks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was because everyone in her job was tested. (Not compulsory, but ‘suggested’) If they had been positive for antibodies, they would have been asked to donate plasma for vaccine trials. It was a blood test to see if she had been infected, different to the throat-swab test.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Bad news week I’m afraid Pete. I guess people have their limits, we’ve seen that here in Australia as well. People barging past others on escalators or not keeping their distance in shops. If you thought people would pick up some new well mannered habits then you’ll be disappointed. The fact that they haven’t when there are still significant numbers is infuriating. But as I always say look for the good. There’s plenty of that too.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m also astonished. Here in Europe we’re reopening everything quickly to save the economy thanks to Summer tourism even though the virus hasn’t stopped and high temperatures seem to have no effects whatsoever on the spreading of the pandemic.

    I guess economic growth is the God for which we seem ready to sacrifice thousands and thousands of lives…

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pete, that story was such big news it was all over the place here in the states…as we have soaring numbers in states that re-opened too soon like Texas and Florida…where the politicians don’t even require a face mask in public. But the overall US response to this delay killer has been an embarrassment to the world…had we just shut down for 45 days at the beginning, we could have mitigated much of the spread and saved tens of thousands of lives…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. And testing. Testing is so important along with contract tracing. Countries that have locked down fairly early without a lot of testing haven’t fared as well either. But then again with such a big population I don’t know what would have been possible. I just know I hate that ballbags and even now I’m terrified he’ll get re-elected.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Same here Pete. We had 9,000 new cases in Florida just yesterday. After the hoop-la of reopening the bars have been shut down again. The Gov already got his photo op with the Great Leader.
    Stay well and best regards.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. It seems that there are those types of people who don’t want to follow the guidelines everywhere, and they are slowing things down! Are you guys having to wear masks? Our state governor has ordered everyone in Washington to wear a mask in public, and oh my, you would not believe the resistance he is getting! People just don’t “get it,” and some of them won’t until the virus hits them at home. It’s really sad.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We only have to wear masks on public transport. In the rural area where I live, I would say much less than 10% of people are wearing them, but the population is small, and it’s easy to stay apart. I keep masks in my car for shopping, but don’t wear them when walking with my dog. I don’t get close to anyone though.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. The high today is expected to be 109°F / 43°C. We do have a poor excuse for a beach at Lake Mead, but I doubt anyone even cares to go there (assuming it’s open). As for the pandemic, it’s on the rise here in the States. People only have so much patience. On the flip side of the coin, hospitals can only handle so many patients.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. it is so sad that what we all sacrificed in three months is all gone. totally ignoring the use of masks in public and social distancing. and our numbers are getting worse. what a shame!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As we our own pathetic ‘leader’, everything seems to be just a knee-jerk reaction to whatever happens, with no plans to stop it happening in the first place.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  11. It’s just horrifying to see the level of ignorance and selfishness displayed by so many people. Lately it seems that as a society we seemed to un-learn history lessons, and that combined with insane leadership is a very deadly combination. Let’s hope that those who are careful can survive this madness, but frankly I think it’s criminal.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It seems to have disappeared (or never existed) in everyone under 60, Peggy. There is a feeling of ‘mass hysteria’ on the beaches and in big cities, as if those people are immune to catching anything. Such a shame, after all the hard work and sacrifice of so many dedicated people.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I agree with you, Pete. Nothing would induce me to go and sit on such a crowded beach even if there was no pandemic. No pleasure in it at all. Matt Hancock said if there is a spike in the number of cases he has the power to close the beaches – made me think of bolting horses and stable doors.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I felt thoroughly ashamed to see the inconsiderate crowds on the beaches of my home town, and the disgusting aftermath. I really don’t want to be judgmental, because I don’t have a bored partner or fractious, stir-crazy kids to consider, so I can understand the need to make the most of the good weather while it lasts, but going to an ever-popular beach at this particular time was a very bad idea, and leaving all that rubbish was reprehensible. I’ll continue with my predominantly hermetic existence for the foreseeable future: staying alive is the priority! Cheers, Jon.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Sadly, I was not at all surprised by the inconsiderate behaviour and rubbish left behind. I have seen this on foreign beaches populated by British holidaymakers since the 1970s, to the extent that I used to pretend I wasn’t English. It is like some kind of national disease, to be deliberately inconsiderate.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I think at the end of the day people are going to have to make up their own minds as to whether they put themselves at risk. The virus isn’t going away any time soon, and so it would be wise to wear a mask in crowded areas, or just avoid crowds and public transport altogether. Some people don’t feel this way, and so if they catch it, it’s their look out. Unfortunately though the NHS will have to pick up the pieces.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It does seem as if a very large section of the population have ‘had enough’, I agree. Unfortunately, they can then carry that virus to whoever they pass or meet, even if they have no symptoms. As for me, I will still be keeping a very low profile.
      Thanks, Stevie.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  15. I see more and more people going without masks…..I now have a sign on my door…No Mask then do not knock…..I am old so I cherish what little time I have left and I be damned if I will let some stupid shorten even more. chuq

    Liked by 3 people

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