“We can never go home because the concept of home is lost on us.”: 60s Scoop adoptee: Eric Schweig

I urge you to read this personal true story of an adopted Native American. He pulls no punches with a powerful account of his formative years.

The BIG ISMS

These words are, according to Eric Schweig, his “mission statement.”

“We can never go home because the concept of home is lost on us.”

Adoption of aboriginal children by Caucasian couples is to me, for lack of a better term ‘State Sanctioned Kidnapping.’ Too often Euro-American couples are preoccupied with the romantic notion of having a “real live Indian baby” or a “real live Inuit baby” which instantly transforms the child into an object rather than a person. For decades our communities’ babies have been unceremoniously wrenched from the hands of their biological parents and subjected to a plethora of abuses. Physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and a host of others.

I have first-hand knowledge of this because I was one of those children.

For years my adoptive parents beat me bloody on a regular basis. I’ve been trapped in rooms naked and beaten with belt buckles, hockey sticks…

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16 thoughts on ““We can never go home because the concept of home is lost on us.”: 60s Scoop adoptee: Eric Schweig

  1. Pete, I just got online and wanted to thank you for sharing. As an adoptee, I found many stories like Eric’s across North America. My book series Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects has personal narratives all about this history. Eric is a famous actor that many people recognize but many do not what happened in his early life. [https://blog.americanindianadoptees.com/] Knowing our history is very important. It connects the dots. It speaks to assimilation and genocide.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There were numerous projects run by governments in North America. One was called ARENA which trafficked children between the US and Canada. Churches ran programs to adopt them to non-Indians. Tribal parents were not allowed to keep their own children.

      Liked by 1 person

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