Vera’s Life: Part Seven

This is the seventh part of a fiction serial, in 848 words.

May didn’t last the night, and not long after, Vera got to go to her first funeral. Because Derek’s family had money, at least more than the Dodds, it was a fancy affair. As it was her older sister’s funeral, Elsie insisted that they all wear black, though Albert had to make do with a black tie worn with the blue suit. A new suit was a step too far, financially. Vera was given a black wool dress that was someone else’s and was altered to fit her for the day. Her mum told her not to get it messy, as it was going back in the morning. It was far too long, but it wouldn’t matter on such a young girl. Elsie also bought her some black wool stockings from the market, with white elastic loops to hold them up, and a black beret. Vivian left little George with her mother-in-law, and turned up looking very glamorous, with a black veil hanging from the brim of her hat.

Elsie wasn’t amused. “You’re not going on a date, Vivian. Black silk stockings indeed! And take some of that make-up off before we leave the house, you look like a showgirl.” They got two buses to the Pimlico house, and joined the other mourners inside. Most of them were serious looking people from Derek’s side, and Vera didn’t know any of them. But Uncle Ernie had turned up, much to everyone’s surprise. Derek had sent him a telegram, and had deliberately not told Elsie.

Ernest Baker was the oldest on Elsie’s side. The brother who was ten years older, and never spoken about. He had once sent Vera a five shilling postal order for Christmas, and she had asked about the uncle she had never met. Mum and dad told her to mind her business, but Vivian told her the story when they were in the bedroom later that night. Uncle Ernie was a theatrical, Viv said. He had never married, and moved around the country in touring shows, pantomimes, and revues. When he couldn’t get a steady role with a company, he used to sing in pubs in East London, dressed as a woman. According to Viv, he had a dingy flat off East India Dock Road, and lived with a much younger Chinese man.

When Vera could see nothing wrong with that and shrugged, Viv dropped to a barely audible whisper. “Don’t you get it? He’s queer, bent. You know, a fairy”.

Vera had absolutely no idea what her older sister was talking about, so just nodded.

The fancy hearse turned up not long after they arrived, pulled by four black horses. May’s coffin was carried out of the parlour and slowly loaded inside, visible through the glass. Elsie had brought some white flowers, and a man in a black top hat took them from her and placed them inside. Black funeral cars had been hired to take everyone, and they had their own one for the four of them. They followed the hearse at the same pace as the horses, all the way to the church, and then on to The Brompton Cemetery in Chelsea.
In the car, Vera watched as her mum got increasingly upset, and although she didn’t feel that sad about Aunt May, she was worried for her mum.

When the coffin was lowered into the grave, some of those who had been listening to the vicar went forward and threw dirt on top of it. Vera stayed at the back with Viv, trying to keep her dress clean. There was a bit of a do after, at a hotel in Kensington. It was the fanciest place Vera had ever seen in her life, with carpets so thick they made her feel like she was bouncing as she walked on them. The food was good too, and Vera smiled as she watched Vivian stuffing some sausage rolls and vol-au-vents into her handbag to take home for Roy. She could tell her dad had probably had one too many beers, as his voice was getting louder, but her mum made one glass of sherry last for the two hours they were there.

The sweet stuff was some of the best Vera had ever eaten, with tiny cakes covered in fondant icing, and small pastries full of sultanas and crunchy sugar on top. She had to stop herself eating any more of them, as she had started to feel a bit sick. The best thing to come out of the funeral was that Uncle Ernie seemed to have made up with her mum, and they had a cuddle before everyone left. Then he came and found Vera, and gave her half a crown as he patted her face. Viv had been right though. He smelled of perfume, and had powder on his face. But Vera really liked him anyway.

In the bus on the way home, Elsie stopped crying, and Albert sobered up. He turned to his wife, and smiled. “Reckon that’s the last time we’ll ever see Derek, anyway”.

He was right of course. They never saw him again.

22 thoughts on “Vera’s Life: Part Seven

    1. Thanks, Don. Uncle Ernie is based on a neighbour of ours who used to perform a drag act in the local pub. He was actually a really nice man, and not creepy. His ‘friend’ wasn’t Chinese, but from the Philippines. My mum used to refer to him as a ‘Confirmed bachelor’, and then giggle. 🙂
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. (1) You never know whose funeral will be your first. But you always know whose funeral will be your last.
    (2) Vivian went for the sexy Elvira look. But Elsie wanted her to tone it down a bit: “I think Morticia Addams would be more appropriate for a funeral, don’t you think?”
    (3) Bad citation: “Uncle Ernie was a theatrical fairy. He moved around Pixie Hollow in touring shows, pantomimes, and revues.”
    (4) “The fancy hearse turned up not long after they arrived, pulled by four black horses.” Those horses were available for funerals because the apocalypse had yet to be scheduled.
    (5) At the burial, Vera had to stay back with Vivian in order to keep her dress clean. That’s a dirty shame.
    (6) It’s a good thing Vivian stuffed the vol-au-vents into her scarlet handbag. They’re so light, all it takes is a strong puff of air for them to be gone with the wind.
    (7a) “Then he came and found Vera, and gave her half a crown as he patted her face.” Legend has it that the two kings of Sparta each wore half a crown. Later, these half crowns were stylized into tiaras.
    (7b) Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water. Jack fell down and broke his crown. So he gave half of it to Jill, and kept the other half for himself.
    (8) After watching the movie “10,” I said, “Reckon that’s the last time I’ll ever see Derek.” But I was wrong. I saw her again in “Tarzan, the Ape Man” and “Bolero.”

    Liked by 1 person

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