An Alphabet Of Things I Like: E

Elephants.

Who could dislike elephants?

I was lucky enough to go on a holiday to Kenya and Tanzania many years ago, and see these magnificent endangered animals in large numbers outside the sad confines of a zoo environment.

It is good to know that they are no longer cruelly exploited in old-fashioned circuses, though some countries still use them for entertaining tourists, like the football-playing elephants in Thailand. I would love to see all such exploitation banned. They are caring, sensitive animals, and for them this is no better than slavery.

They are still killed in large numbers too, mainly for the ivory in their tusks. It would be good if every country in the UN gave enough money to eradicate this terrible poaching, which continues as I type this.

You only have to look at this lovely baby elephant to see the joy in an animal that lives in family groups, cares for each other, and can live up to the age of 70.

72 thoughts on “An Alphabet Of Things I Like: E

  1. I can’t a better like for E than elephant. I worked so many circuses where they used elephants and hated each ‘act’. I was thrilled when the UK banned elephants in circuses. I never thought it would take place in the US, but it did. Thank the UK for showing the way’
    Since elephants are my wife’ favorites, our home is filled with elephant art.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I was delighted when circuses were banned from using elephants. They were treated so badly during their so-called training’. The circus owners should have been ashamed.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  2. Long before I was as informed about zoos and circuses as I have come to be, I encountered and loved elephants at both of them. In 1962, the first elephant born in the United States in 44 years was born at the local zoo and was the scene of great rejoicing and a naming contest. “Packy” won out. I do think that many of us who now care so deeply about animals first met them in captivity.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Who could dislike an elephant? They are highly intelligent–if I could wave my magic wand, all the poachers would be dead (that’s not a nice wish, is it?) and the elephants would grow to be 70. Elephants, horses, sea turtles, dolphins. Those are my favorite in the kindgom.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am with you on the poachers, Cindy. But I presume they only poach because they are poor, and because people want to buy their goods. It is the end market, the buyers, that need to be eradicated.
      Best wishes, Pete. x

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Carolyn. I cannot recall how many petitions I have signed, and how much I have donated over the years. Sadly, the slaughter continues, and some countries even sell ‘Shoot an elephant’ trips now. Appalling people who pay a small fortune to shoot a helpless elephant. They are mostly Americans, and I despise anyone who participates.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wow, never knew about that trip you took before reading about it in this post. That really is awesome! Probably no surprise to you that I completely agree with the things you wrote here. Every animal deserves our respect (okay…maybe not wasps, as I’m terrified of those😂😂), and it’s sad to think that there are still people out there who only think about making a profit😢 There are so many animals we lost to greed, let’s hope this will never become one of them.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I’ve never seen an elephant up close, but I completely agree with your respect & reverence for them. If the human race could only make the mental adjustment that ivory has no commercial value, by using sustainable replacement materials, and auction houses refusing to handle items made from it, there is more than a fighting chance that the poaching & killing would stop. As for the latter of my 2 prerequisites, I am not hopeful, and people’s shabby venality fills me with disgust. Cheers, Jon.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Animals are still suffering because of the different attitudes to them in SE Asia and China. Ridiculous assumptions that rhino horn increases virility, other nonsensical medical ideas, and so-called ‘traditions’.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

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