An Alphabet Of Things I Like: L

Lizards.

Lizards come in all shapes and sizes. Most countries have a native lizard, some many varieties. Even Britain has three native species of lizard.

Some are very colourful.

Others can grow to an imposing size, and can be dangerous.

My personal favourite has always been the Chameleon. This colour-changing lizard has strange swivelling eyes, and a very unusual way of moving. It can also extend its tongue considerable distances to catch its prey.

I have never been tempted to own one as a pet. They require special care, and I think they should be left where they belong, in the wild.

But they have always fascinated me.

49 thoughts on “An Alphabet Of Things I Like: L

  1. I love chameleons. My mum apparently kept them as pets as a child. In Afrikaans a chameleon has two different names. Verkleurmannetjie, which is my favourite word and directly translates as “little colour changing man” and trapsoetjies, which doesn’t exactly translate but can mean either little sweet walker or little soft walker.

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  2. Geckos and lizards galore here…I sit every night and count them and watch them feast on the insects the smaller ones can get inside the ceiling light they are LED so they don’t get hot…Then mama comes out from my eaves to supervise…A snake had one of the big ones the other week luckily we called the snake man and they got the snake to unwind and did the lizard scoot..he had a lucky escape…They are also food and my grandson always catches some for his nan to BBQ when he visits her…But they are safe here we don’t eat them they eat the mosi’s so they can stay.

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  3. Lizards are the most facinating creatures I have come across. They can walk easily on walls and roof unside down inspite of their huge size. Some species have a grip strong enough to carry a man up. In fact, Indian History has an example where lizards named as “Chandan Goh” were used during a war to scale impossible tall walls of a fortress–Each Soldiers had tied a rope to a lizard’s body and once the lizard had climbed all the way up the wall, they climbed the same ropes. The lizard easily handled their weight, along with the iron armour they wore.

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  4. My mother doesn’t like them, but I’ve always found them fascinating. And you’ve found some truly spectacular pictures, Pete. I don’t know what I would have chosen for L (perhaps literature), but I like your choice. Take care.

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  5. We have plenty of them in the summer, not sure where they go to i the winter. I often find their eggs in building sand pits. Its good to have them around as I’m sure they are predators to lots of the things I don’t want in the garden. We also get plenty of salamanders, slow worms and grass snakes, the latter like to lay eggs in my humanure compost piles πŸ™‚

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  6. Doesn’t Torrito have a lizard he mentions now and then? I loved geckos when I encountered them inside my hotel room in Guam. First of course they alarmed me since I had never seen lizards indoors.

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  7. I’m very fond of lizards. I’ve encountered a lot of them on hikes and climbs, but I particularly like the larger ones, like the chuckwalla. I’ve seen ornate tree lizards at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and once observed “horny toads” (desert horned lizards) mating over in Red Rock Canyon. So far, I’ve not run into a Gila monster, but I’d like to!

    https://www.birdandhike.com/Wildlife/Lizard/_Lizards.htm

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    1. Thanks very much for the link, Ned. I am sure the lizards that are not native to the USA will help keep down the unwanted insects. But I hope their introduction does not contribute to the demise of those lizards that are indigenous.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  8. I love geckos, though some can have a nasty bite, water dragons are fabulous, and we once had a chameleon which lived in our hedge in Jo’burg. I’m not keen on the big ones though!

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  9. We always had a lizard or two about the house in Pakistan – not as pets, but just doing what lizards do and eating insects. A friend’s grandson in America had a pet lizard – can’t remember what kind it was – but it hardly moved, although occasionally its tongue would flick out.

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  10. The son in law used to keep Kimono dragons or something like that, and we had to look after them when they moved house. I say, we, I mean Phil, there was no way I was handling the live crickets they have to be fed with! 😳

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    1. I don’t think you mean Komodo Dragons, as they are the biggest lizards in the world, and one is shown in picture 4. πŸ™‚ I wouldn’t like having to have the insects at home to feed the smaller ones either.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. We get one (small like a chameleon) in the garage almost every summer for a few weeks. I am always glad to see them when they are here. I see them on the side of buildings in this area from time to time in the summer also. Warmest regards, Theo

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  12. Chameleons are amazing things; many creatures have developed a colouring which helps to protect them from predators, but there can’t be many that can change their whole body colouring at will to suit their environment. Nature at its most inventive! Cheers, Jon.

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      1. My real name is Liz. I used to have friends in Cornwall who christened me the lizard after lizard point. Then when I started my own blog I was teaching yoga so I called it Lizardyoga’s weblog

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  13. Absolutely fascinating animals. I’ve never understood the need to keep one as a pet. Some animals just should live in the wild and this is one of them. That third picture is amazing by the way! πŸ˜€ Definitely share your love for these creatures as well PeteπŸ˜€

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