66 thoughts on “An Alphabet Of Things I Don’t Like: C

  1. I scrolled through all 50+ comments to see if there was anyone who liked cockroaches. I couldn’t find one. Apparently, the verdict is unanimous.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. (1) I’d put a stamp on a roach, too, if I knew to what country I should mail it.
    (2) Back in Kansas City, there was a car dealership known as Jack Roach Cadillac. The ads always boasted the “Roach approach.” I never approached that dealership.
    (3) My friend Hal has two roaches. The small one is named Stan. The large hissing one is named Ollie. Together, they’re quite comedic.
    (4) What do you call a cockroach if it’s a female? My pet ladybug, who is a male, wants to know.
    (5) A roach should never encroach upon human territory.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Yep: “Cockroaches eat anything. Human and animal wastes, feces, spoiled food, fresh foods, rotting carcasses, glue, and even their fellow cockroaches.”

        Which makes you wonder why: “Cockroaches are food to some cultures. China, Thailand, and Mexico are some of the countries where cockroaches are prepared fried, grilled, sautΓ©ed, or boiled.”

        Liked by 2 people

        1. I would never eat those filthy disease-carriers, even fried!
          (Though apparently the ‘edible ones’ are bred specially, and not around anything dirty. So I was assured in China. I still didn’t eat them)

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Am I unusual when I say I’ve never encountered one? I can understand your revulsion, of course, and with regard to pets, I suppose the old aphorism “it takes all sorts to make a world” applies: my younger daughter likes snakes! I have the idea that I’ve seen somewhere that crushing them doesn’t stop them proliferating, but I could be wrong there. I would like to think I would dispose of it humanely if I did encounter one, but that remains to be tested……. I always like to let houseflies escape out of a window when they appear: that said, I had a loft-full of them recently, so I will confess that I used a killer spray to eradicate them, although a few did manage to escape the killing zone into the living area, and they did eventually make it to freedom πŸ˜‰ Cheers, Jon.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I never spare the life of anything that spreads disease, or can bite or sting me. All flies and wasps are killed on sight, using fly-swats, not sprays. (Because of my dog, I don’t use fly spray) Cockroaches are common in communal buildings like flats, hospitals, and hotels. They like to use the ducting to live in, and it enables them to move around unseen. They are also more common abroad, in my experience. I have never seen one inside my house, but would kill it instantly if I did. This is what the filthy things are capable of, Jon.

      Wherever cockroaches go, they leave behind traces of their existence. Signs that you have a cockroach infestation include feces, saliva, and parts of their bodies that they shed or that fall off. Similar to dust mites, these parts of a cockroach contain specific proteins or allergens that may cause allergies or can even trigger asthma symptoms.
      In addition to these proteins that the cockroaches naturally carry, there have been tests done on cockroaches that examine the pathogens in their bodies. The scary thing is that cockroaches can carry some serious diseases. Salmonella Typhi, which causes Typhoid, has been found in cockroaches. Poliomyelitis, which causes Polio, has also been found in these insects. They can also cause Dysentery, a disease that causes severe diarrhea that may include bleeding.’

      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I first saw them in Geneva! They live in the ventilation shafts, and if you went into the kitchen at night and switched the lights on you would see them scuttling around! Not as bad as the huge ones seen on my overland trip though…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I remember them in hospital corridors at night. Hundreds of them scuttling around! A nurse told me that they swarmed over the hospital kitchens after they closed for the night.
      Best wishes, Pete. x

      Like

  5. Pets???? Who in their right minds would keep them as pets?πŸ€”πŸ€”πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
    Well…no brainer here really, I hate these as much as you do. Only one time I felt sorry for one, was back in a zoo, where one ended up on his back and it couldn’t get back up. I really wanted to help it then, as no one beast deserves to die in that way. Never know if it made it back up again though….πŸ€”πŸ€”πŸ€”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. They are kept as pets by thousands of people. I don’t get that either. As for the one on its back, the zoo keepers should have been on the case, but I can’t say it bothers me how things like that die, as long as they die! πŸ™‚
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I don’t kill things as a rule but I’m with you here too. I can’t stand the things – in India there were huge ones all over the place. Shudders!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I used to see them in hospitals and industrial premises when I lived in London. I have never seen one in Norfolk, fortunately. They were also a ‘feature’ on some foreign holidays. I hate the way they scuttle around!
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

        1. I saw something like that in Kenya. A huge flying thing. I asked the waiter what it was, and he said ‘Roach’. Made me shiver! Fortunately, I never saw one again while I was there, or since.
          Best wishes, Pete.

          Like

All comments welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.