The Covid Passport

When someone receives the vaccination for Coronavirus, they are issued with a small card. Their details are also registered on the system, so it is recorded that they have been vaccinated.

Reading online about people who are going to refuse the vaccine, and knowing at least one member of my own close family who will not have it, I started to think about the potential repercussions of exercising your right not to be vaccinated.

That small card, and the computerised record that back it up, could well turn out to be your passport to a return to something like normal life in the not too distant future.

Imagine the restrictions that could be introduced on people who cannot prove they have been vaccinated.

Want to go and see a film, or a show at the theatre?
Show me your card.

Want to book a table at a restaurant?
Show me your card.

Want to use public transport?
Show me your card.

Want to book a foreign holiday, travelling by train, sea or air?
Show me your card.

Want to stay overnight in a hotel, motel, or B&B?
Show me your card.

Want to rent a car or van?
Show me your card.

Want to adopt a child?
Show me your card.

Want to register at a dentist?
Show me your card.

Want to have your hair cut, or a beauty treatment?
Show me you card.

Want to drink in a pub, or go into a nightclub?
Show me your card.

Want to take driving lessons or take the driving test?
Show me your card.

Want to apply for a job where you will be working with others?
Show me your card.

Want to study at a university, or college?
Show me your card.

I could go on. There are many more potential pitfalls of not being vaccinated.

Of course, none of this may happen. I have certainly not heard that is going to. There would need to be extra administration put into place, employment of more security guards and doormen, and then there will always be fake cards.

Nonetheless, if you are considering refusing the vaccine, I have some advice.

Think twice.

70 thoughts on “The Covid Passport

  1. I am at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to the order for getting the vaccine so I doubt it will be offered to me for some months yet. I have no reservations in taking it. I have done a lot of research into the development of the vaccine and I don’t feel there is anything to fear.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I don’t fear it, but I resent it being called a vaccine, as it doesn’t cure the problem. It is just like the Flu Jab, something to reduce symptoms that will probably have to be given every year.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  2. You are so right, Pete. Refusal could be a pathway to many roadblocks. I still have my card of childhood vaccinations, and this one should be added to the list. At the moment, our state is a disaster in administering the vaccine. Sigh!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Pete. I have my own beliefs, which I don’t want to share, about illness, and I have never had the regular ‘flu vaccine; I have also never once in my life, [which I’m sure I would recall] had regular ‘flu [plenty of colds, sure]. However, after much deliberation, I have decided to have this vaccine, primarily for the sake of my daughters and my granddaughter, but also for selfish reasons, which you detail in your post. I don’t like the idea of the restriction of our liberty, but I am also too old and tired to continue fighting for principles that will most likely result in any amount of aggravation, however justified, from the ‘authorities’ [the census is another case in point: I refused the last one and got away with only one ‘visit’]. What’s the worst that could happen? I could die from side-effects; but I could also die from Covid; I don’t see it as being obedient: simply practical, or expedient, if you like. Cheers, Jon.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have also never had the flu vaccine, despite being old enough to be offered it for free, and my wife nagging me about having it. I did get Flu symptoms earlier this year, but they were controlled with shop-bought medicines. I doubt they would work with C-19 though, and for some of the reasons I stated above, I will have the vaccine for that.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I cant see it for now, not until the vaccine is proved to stop you carrying and transmitting. A card to say you have had the jab is of little merit at the moment. However I can see that testing will become mandatory to travel outside of your country and or attending large events. An extra £20 to go to Glastonbury is small change for those who want to go 🙂 And this will most likely d=be driven by insurance companies, not the government (they don’t have any money left). 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Eddy. I am thinking more about companies and organisations appearing to ‘stay safe’ by refusing access to those who refuse vaccination. Of course, it is not a ‘true’ vaccine as we understand them, just something that reduces symptoms when you catch the virus. In that respect, I think calling it a vaccine should not be allowed.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. No conspiracy theories for me either, but I am thinking hard on it. I have enough problems without being subjected to a vaccine that may trigger more weakness in my immune system. Plus the fact that as fast as strains are being generated, they will never have a vaccine to protect us from most of them.

    I’m just real leery of having it. I may change my mind, but I will watch a little more before deciding.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your thoughts, Ron. I can see the issue for you, though initial studies have shown few serious side effects. They also claim that the current vaccine is effective against the ‘Kent’ and ‘South African’ variants, but we only have their word for that so far.
      Best ishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I recall carrying a medical card along with my passport when travelling, but don’t remember ever been asked to show it. Personally I don’t think having the vaccine is going to make me feel safer going out and mixing as it doesn’t seem to stop the virus spreading or from catching it, just reduces the symptoms. I reckon we’ll have to live with this, like we do with flu.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, in that respect, it is wrong to call it a vaccine. Though ‘symptom reducer’ is a bit long-winded. I still suspect that won’t stop various organisations jumping on the bandwagon of restricting those who do not get vaccinated.
      Best wisjhes, Pete. x

      Like

  7. Well, I am going to be very unpopular, but will admit that I have turned it down twice in a week. I have my own reasons for that. Nothing to do with nanothingys or any conspiracy theories. My reasons are good ones, but most would not think so. However, Pete, I CAN envisage the scenario that you have put forwards. I may have the vaccination in the future but now was not the right time for me. So be it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry, but you are ‘anonymous’ for now, according to WordPress. I respect your right to make that decision, as long as you don’t complain later about being some form of ‘social outcast’.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  8. I think you’re right about needing a card to show you’ve been vaccinated to do anything or go anywhere. I don’t think that’ll happen soon, but I really believe that Covid is not going away, that there will be variants that need new vaccines, and it’s going to go on for many years yet, or always be around like flu, only more devastating. We have trashed the planet for a long time, I think mother nature has allowed this to escape in order to thin the herd and the anti-vazzers can go to the head of the line as far as I’m concerned. Maybe by the time it’s fizzled itself out, there won’t be too many people left taking up too many resources and the planet and our children’s children will have a better future.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have always thought we should give the planet back to nature. Mankind’s greed has really been the only thing wrong with it. Humans have outlived their usefulness, Meanwhile, I think the ‘card checks’ will come in time, though not yet.
      Then the anti-vaxxers will be bleating about not being able to do the same things that everyone else can do.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I am in the group that has been eligible for the past ten days or more. The thing is, here in Washington State, things are in such a sorry state we are unable to find a place to register to get vaccinated, That will change, but for now, it is simply frustrating, Warmest regards, Theo

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I will get the vaccine, hopefully sooner than later. We can’t know fully how effective it will be or how long it will be protective, but it’s all we’ve got for now so the risk of not getting the vaccine is far greater. On the other front – I hope effort is also being spent on therapeutics and treatments as it seems to me to be equally important.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Susanne. I for one hope they continue to research a ‘real’ vaccine, not just one that reduces symptoms, but one that stops us contracting the virus to begin with.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  10. I understand that some people are wary of having a card that says they have had the vaccination for data I.D purposes, but most people have smart phones which submit all sorts of data to companies, so unless they get rid of their phones worrying about a vaccination card is a bit pointless. I haven’t got a smart phone as I have no liking for them or need of one.

    That said many European countries have I.D cards, so I wonder if on the mainland they are all worrying about vaccination cards/apps?

    People need to realise that this virus poses a danger to many groups in society and having a vaccination is the only way we will beat it ( or at least control it to a greater degree ). There are far worse medical procedures people go through than a needle in your arm that is a pinch for a few seconds. I had the influenza one a couple of weeks ago. My arm was slightly sore for 3 days but otherwise I had no ill effects. I haven’t got a chip in my blood!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, WN. If people realised how closely they are already monitored, even a ‘chip’ in the vaccine would not seem so bad. Would the same people give up their smartphones to avoid detection and surveillance? I doubt that.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

    1. I know some of them have what they consider to be well-reasoned arguments that the virus is merely a means of control, and not as bad as ‘Flu. For my part, I am not willing to gamble on tha theory.
      Thanks, Cathy.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Pete, as the months go by, and we begin to have rational thinking replace the conspiracy theories that still percolate, I think we will see the percentage of those who refuse vaccinations decrease – and I fully expect to have to show a “Covid Card” to travel – and I applaud it…do you really want me coming to your country with the potential to spread a deadly disease? Of course not! It’s time for all of us to work together to eradicate a once in a lifetime pandemic…canyou imagine the 50-million+ who died a century ago – would they have refused treatment to save lives?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Indeed John. The people in 1918 would’ve been so pleased to have had the chance for a vaccination ( and millions of other people throughout history for other pandemics and epidemics ).

      I’ve pointed this out to anti vaxxers and they always come up with the reply that viruses lose their virulence over time so vaccinations are not necessary! After thousands have died of course–

      Other responses I get are that it’s only due to dirty conditions viruses flourish, and hygiene and clean water has got rid of pandemics. They of course ignore polio in the 1950s.

      Then if one uses Covid as an example that hygiene doesn’t completely remove virus epidemics they state it’s a “hoax.” There’s no reasoning with these people.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I think the ideas I speculate would be a good thing, John. We are all monitored anyway, whenever we buy something with plastic, or log on to any device. Knowing we are vaccinated might be a worthwhile use of such surveiilance.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m sorry if you’ve already told us, but I can’t recall if you’ve been vaccinated yet. I’m sure you would have written a post about it. My wife and I are going to do so without hesitation. Unfortunately, we are likely to be in a later group as we fall just under the 65 cutoff. For once, we wanted to be older, and we screwed that up too.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am not old enough yet, Pete. My wife has though, as she is working front-line for the NHS. Even though she is 9 years younger than me, she had to have the vaccine because of her job. I will be in the group for late March/early April, so I am told.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I have had many vaccines over the years including yellow fever, typhoid, and a raft of hepatitis vaccines for work. I have traveled the world and at no time was my vaccination card requested, nor was my health status questioned.
    The fact the I reserve the right not to have the Covid vaccine does not make me ‘anti vax’.
    The Covid passport won’t be a piece of card, it will become digital. Tests are already taking place in Eire.
    To link vaccination to access is clearly an infringement of a persons civil rights.
    People will be able to go shopping with HIV or TB but a healthy unvaccinated citizen may face restrictions of movement.
    Let’s not forget that this present nonsense still has a survival rate of 99%.

    Keep watching the msm, wear your masks, live in fear, support the removal of other citizens human rights, trade your grandchildren’s rights to a childhood you took for granted, and hope the crocodile eats you last.

    Nobody gets out of here alive.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I guess it could be an issue, and it does make sense. Possibly not for certain things, like public services, but for things when the owner has the right to decide who can use the service and who can’t, why would they want to take the risk and put other users at risk unnecessarily? One of the complication is likely to be that as the virus changes, they will need to keep changing the vaccines, and people will need to have different versions of the vaccine (eventually the thought is that COVID-19 might stay around but not be quite as serious once a lot of people have some immunity to it, and there will be regular new vaccines, as happens with the flu).
    Irrational beliefs are very difficult to change.
    Take care, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Olga. As I said, it is only a theory. But I cannot help thinking that some version of that theory will eventually impact anyone who declines vaccination.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  15. A way of sneaking ID cards into the system? Though I have no objection to ID cards – only younger son has managed to avoid working for the government, police, armed forces etc and has moved frequently, but I’m sure government records know everything about our family. Most parents trust their tiny precious babies to various vaccinations, but adults are too scared!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Anyone who has any online presence can be easily monitored anyway, Janet. To think otherwise is naive. And I know what I am talking about, as I worked for Met Police Special OPs, and had dealings with SIS and Cheltenham GCHQ.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Precisely; if you look up someone you were in infants school with you are bound to come up with something about them, even if it’s only the on line parish newsletter and the flower rota. Creepy really. With all your work you probably/obviously know all about our family! My uncle in Australia used to tell people his youngest son was a secret agent and working for the agriculture department was just a cover!

        Liked by 1 person

  16. My brother had polio. Thankfully he did not suffer terrible side effects like many others did, but it was very scary. When I think of all the lives saved and deformities eliminated because of the polio vaccine, I can’t understand why anyone would not have a Covid vaccination.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I was vaccinated against so many things, including TB, and Smallpox. The Covid vaccine is not really the same, or as effective, but it is much better than nothing. My 36-year old stepson is going to refuse the vaccine. I have warned him that his sister might stop him seeing his niece and nephew, but he doesn’t care. He is convinced that there are ‘nanobots’ in it that will control him and keep him under surveiilance.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I do hope your stepson doesn’t tell the government and give them the idea to try to put nanobots in the vaccine. 🙂 However, his fear is a bit more realistic than the nightmare fears “anti-vaxers” have. Warmest regards, Theo

        Liked by 1 person

  17. I don’t mind having the vaccine, Pete, and will do so when we get them here at some point this year. I don’t think they will be the instant cure in the short term people are hoping for, but they will help a great deal in the medium term. I just hope the vaccine works on all the variants that seem to be popping up.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It is no magic bullet, but better than nothing, Robbie. I was just thinking about how not being vaccinated (by refusing it) might impact your life in years to come. I could be wrong, but I have a feeling something like this will eventually be implemented.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 2 people

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