Ollie And The Heatwave

Since Ollie turned nine in February, he has slowed down considerably. But he still likes nothing better than to accompany us anywhere in my car, and is able to jump up onto his bed in the back as if he is still only two years old. So he was delighted when after watching us pack up the car last Thursday, he was called outside to leap into his spot.

The first day in Essex was actually overcast, and not very warm. He was pleased to see my cousin’s two small dogs again, even though having so many people in the house made him rather agitated, perhaps because he worried that he might be left behind.

By the time we arrived in Kent late on Friday afternoon, the weather had started to warm up considerably. We were grateful to be able to eat outside at my friend’s house, but Ollie stayed inside, finding some cool carpet in the shade to lie on.

On Saturday, it was almost 30 degrees (C) and we drove the short distance to a local Country park to give him a good walk. In the absence of a river, I took along his water bowl and a large bottle of water. Ollie was soon slowing down in the heat, so after an hour, we sat under a tree near the cafe there, and Ollie was lying down on the long grass in the shade. Despite drinking lots of water, he couldn’t seem to cool down, and was panting constantly.

The next day, I walked him to the local park near my friend’s house, somwehere he has been many times before. But there was a lot of traffic in that large town, and Ollie kept stopping on the pavement, flinching at the noise as cars and buses drove past close to us. By the time I got to the park, I had to sit in some shade and give him a big drink from his bowl. As he showed no sign of wanting to continue the walk after that, I decided to head back, by which time it was close to 31C there.

He spent the rest of the time lying on the kitchen floor, and when the sun moved around and we sat outside to eat, he ventured out to find any small breeze and the cool decking of her patio. For all three days in Kent, he had seemed grumpy and listless, though I was pleased that he ate all of his food, and had a good appetite.

The drive home on Monday wasn’t too bad, and I decided to stop off at Thetford Forest so that Ollie could get out for a walk, and have a drink. For some reason, he wouldn’t follow me after I parked the car, and kept looking back at it. I had to settle for him having a short drink before getting him back in the car for the one hour drive to Beetley. The next morning, he seemed happier, as the temperature in Norfolk, though still hot, was a full 5C lower than it had been further south. Even so, after fifteen minutes in his preferred area of Beetley Meadows, he ran into the river and stood there for over twenty minutes.

Today was still warm and sunny, but a lot fresher than it has been. Ollie has decided that he must now sniff and mark a lot more places than ever, presumably making up for that ‘lost time’ away. It took me almost thirty minutes to walk less than 400 yards, and I found myself standing waiting for ages until he was ready to catch up.

So at least during this short heatwave, dog-walking now has a new name.

‘Dog-Waiting’.

67 thoughts on “Ollie And The Heatwave

  1. Love the adventures of Ollie! He’s such a love. My dog has not been dealing with the heat well, he prefers the cool tile in the bathroom, it has a view of the patio, and he’s quite comfortable. Thanks for the Ollie update, C

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ollie’s fur doesn’t look very thick, Pit. But it is dense, and he gets hot to the touch. It has dropped back down to 18 C today, so he is much happier.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

    1. 45C would be unheard of here, Shaily. I don’t think I could walk about in such heat now, though I have been to Greece whan I was younger, and it was 43C there.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  2. Dog waiting 🙂
    Our Jackie decides the route nowadays, despite getting all excited when I shout ‘walk’ she will often only follow me for 20 yards and then look at me to tell me that today is not the day. Or she will walk with me and then at various familiar junctions on the route she will decide which way we are going to go thus determining the length of the walk.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. For many years, Ollie ran ahead of me, choosing his preferred route. I had no alternative but to follow him to know where he was. In the last 9 months, I am now in front, and he lags behind until I stop to allow him to catch up. 🙂
      Cheers mate, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Awww. Poor, long-suffering dog … *and* to have missed all those messages from his friends in addition! I bet he‘s ecstatic to be back home — whatever passes for ecstasy at his age! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This heat / humidity is bad for me and I imagine even worse for pets with furry coats. So glad that temperatures should go back to normal next week though I can do without the thunderstorms and heavy rain forecast!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Just seen a forecast for thundery downpours here on Saturday night and Sunday. With a maximum temperature of 21C over the weekend, hopefully Ollie will be less distressed by the heat.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

    1. Hi, WN. In the past, we have tried cooling gel-vests, but they upset him to the extent that he wouldn’t walk wearing one. A fan placed near his bed made him get up and stand behind it, as he doesn’t like the feel of the air it generates. We also tried wet towels, which he shook off immediately. In Beetley, he only has to walk a very short way on a road (around 90 seconds) before he is in Beetley Meadows on grass, so shoes are probably not necessary. Once he is able to stand in the river, that cools him down quickly.
      Thanks for your thoughtful suggestions.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  5. I think “smushed” faced animals have a harder time in hot weather and I daresay because he is a bit older now, having his routine changed might unsettle him. Just like older folk! I’m glad he’s better.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Dot has slowed down in the heat as well. it never used to bother her but she is almost 6 so I guess that makes a difference. Glad Ollie is feeling better now he’s at home.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. 31 C is very hot, especially in the UK where it is so humid. I always find it interesting how, although your weather can get hot and I have been in the UK during a heatwave, it doesn’t burn and frizzle like our heat does.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I just got back from a very dry and hot Greece and told my wife that it’s so much easier to warm yourself up in the cold than it is to cool down…we did all of our hiking early in the morning because by 11a it was brutally hot!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I remember Greek summers, especially in Crete. (Up to 42C there) The hire car was so hot inside, I couldn’t touch the steering wheel. Then after sunset, I was bitten by so many mosquitoes, I almost went crazy!
          Best wishes, Pete.

          Liked by 1 person

All comments welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.