Adjusting To Change

In less than twelve years, my life has changed completely. As well as moving away from London for the first time, I also developed a love of daily routine that changed my entire outlook on life. Recently, I was thinking of some examples that illustrate those changes.

Me, previously.
“It’s not even midnight yet. I’m sure we could find a club still open somewhere. Then we can walk home over Waterloo Bridge and watch the sunrise”.

Me now.
It’s nearly midnight? I can’t believe I have stayed up so late! Time I was tucked up in bed”.

Me, previously.
“Let’s go for a drive somewhere. Doesn’t matter where, just head for the south coast and see where we end up. Maybe go to Rye, or down to Bexhill”.

Me now.
“Out for a drive? Nah. Parking will be a nightmare when we get anywhere, and I might have to drive home after dark”.

Me, previously.
“We could go into the city. Have a look at the sights, then have a nice meal out later”.

Me now.
“The City? Too crowded, and too much hassle to get buses back late in the evening”.

Me, previously.
“I can’t go out to eat without wearing a suit and tie. I don’t care about everyone else, I like to look smart on social occasions”.

Me now.
“I’m not dressing up to eat out in Dereham. Nobody does, and I will look stupid if I do”.

Me, previously.
“I have to go and see that new film. I’ll walk down to Leicester Square tomorrow and catch the late afternoon showing”.

Me now.
“The local cinema will never be showing that, and I can’t be bothered to trek into Norwich. I’ll wait until the DVD comes out”.

Me, previously.
“Let’s try that new coffee place that has opened in Covent Garden. We can get a table outside if we are lucky”.

Me now.
“No way am I going to pay almost four quid for a cup of coffee when I can have one at home for nothing”.

Me, previously.
“Let’s do a weekend away. Maybe a nice village in the Cotswolds, or a hotel by the beach in Sussex”.

Me now.
“No need to go and stay in a village when you already live in one. Besides, who will look after Ollie?”

And many more…

88 thoughts on “Adjusting To Change

  1. Oh oh, you’ve changed into my uncle! We used to laugh about my friend’s aunt who couldn’t go to family reunion because that was her Sainsbury day! You have said your life didn’t change much with Covid, but for a lot of people I think it propelled them into that way of thinking. After everything else that’s happened in the past few years I panic when going out is suggested, working out how to avoid an outing and stay cosily home.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Covid didn’t affect my life, because my routine was already firmly established before it became an issue. But I agree that staying at home affected many people, and they found it too difficult to return to their old lives.
      Thanks very much for your comment.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

  2. That was very amusing.
    Yes, although I’m not retired yet, I feel the same way about a number of things. No matter what we do or don’t do, the main thing is that we are satisfied.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I find retirement very satisfying, Irene. I worry occasionally about living on a fixed income from my pensions, but I lead a more peaceful life, with much less daily stress.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Like

      1. Yes, I think you’re happier when you get older and don’t need to buy as many new things. Also, I won’t need the car as often. That saves fuel money.
        I don’t want to worry too much now. Everything will work out somehow. I hope!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. The good old days of our youth make for wonderful memories when we get older. 🙂 I’m still a nighthawk, but am happy with the slower pace of retirement (and not having to get up at the crack of dawn).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Travel seems to be such a faff these days. I have actually stopped thinking about airports and foreign destinations. I don’t even have a valid passport since my last one expired in 2016.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Is it a sign of age you think? Or that those of us who have lived full lives are happier to just be in the moment. Not so many years ago we used to have four holidays a year, two overseas (usually connected to a work conference) and two in the UK. Now we barely go 30 miles! Eating out was a once a week treat, now it’s too expensive, even takeaway fish and chips is over £15. I’d quite like to travel more, but the thought of it makes me tired! Time to put the slippers on…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My slippers have been on for a long time now, Jude. 🙂
      The thought of all the airport hassle to travel abroad makes me shudder. Unless I win the lottery and can afford chauffeurs and First-Class air tickets, I doubt I will leave the UK again. Julie feels much the same, and she is a lot younger than me.
      Best wishes, Pete. x

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Very well put, Pete. Nicely expressed. We go from being part of life to preferring to watch life quietly from the sidelines. A matter of accepting a different set of priorities. Rather than indulge in life we now prefer living the memories of when we did that. What’s new for me is something I may see or do triggers an odd memory I thought was long forgotten. I’ve turned into my grandfather… “Yep, I remember back in the day…. ….”

    Not sure if all that makes me happy, but it certainly makes me more complacent.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. How true – especially the bit about the cup of coffee. Our new coffee shop always has mums with push chairs outside. I think it is just to be sociable. Winter will put a stop to that – there’s not much room inside! We can’t stay out for long unless we use a convenience. It’s miserable being old.However we are lucky to have our warm comfortable bungalow so we drink our coffee here!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. all so true. I look back on my diary of my time in London and can’t believe what I packed into one day. The number 9 bus was my 2nd home. Wonderful memories – and sadly, that is all we have now Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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