Goodreads

Many of you will be familiar with this company. I know that some of you take the book-reading challenges, and write about them on your blogs. I checked it out, and found that I could leave book reviews, choose my favourite type of genres, and receive suggestions for books I might like to read.

That sounded pretty good, as it is also free of charge. Since I have been determined to read more, after buying the Amazon Kindle Fire, I concluded that joining Goodreads might be worthwhile. So I created an account, using the app on my Kindle Fire. I soon received confirmation, along with some suggested titles, and an invitation to participate in a challenge. (Which I declined)

Early days, but it looked like something I would come back to in the future, and might make some use of. Either way, I didn’t see how it could do any harm. Two days later, and I have started to receive emails from them, advising me of new followers to my profile, others wanting to read my reviews. I thought this was strange, as I haven’t posted any reviews, but I checked one out anyway, by clicking on the email sent by Goodreads.

I was surprised to discover that the woman in question claimed to be a ‘Chef’, and was looking for ‘good sex’. There was a link to her private contact page, which of course I didn’t click on. A few more arrived, all with nice profile pictures, and a variety of ‘occupations’. Each offered something different, from ‘Private contact’, to ‘Hook-ups’, or access to ‘More photos’. I know better than to click on any of their links, but I wonder if others might be fooled?

After all, it comes from a literary site with a solid reputation, (owned by Amazon) and on the surface may seem innocent, if you don’t read the ‘small print’. I am not suggesting Goodreads encourages or facilitates this. It would appear to be outsiders using the ‘follow’ option to facilitate contact with genuine members.

But sadly, it seems like the scammers have found yet another way through, making me ever more convinced that this stuff will never end.

The Idiot List

This is the last of this week’s posts about non-followers, and people who like posts or follow blogs without even reading what is written in them. Since publishing a very sarcastic short post about this very thing, the marketers have been arriving thick and fast. If nothing else, it proves that they read nothing, and just follow key words. As far as I am concerned, they are just idiots; wasting their time, and the time of anyone who actually thinks they might be genuine blog followers. Even as I type this, they are still arriving in my inbox, so I could never list them all. But remembering the title of my previous post, this stream of people with nothing better to do with their time is still pouring in.

There are no links here, as you have no need to find out who they are, or view their sites. I have done that for you. But take a quick look at this list of names, and if you are ever pleased to find them as a new follower, don’t be.

Just delete anything they send you.

Wealthy Affiliates For Free
Kevin J. P. Ebsworth
baa85sss
Antonio Ortegaen
David Alan Barnes
The Lazy Mans Profits
Viewbiz Marketing
Digital Lifestyle
Coffeediva
Best Web Profit
Gold Investing Affiliate
Digital Tools 4U
Your Path To Wealth
Smart Affiliate Secrets
Ivanlor 65
Zoe Winnike
dpapa 187
Bomihill
Email-Hog
Extratrafficane
Zoran Simovic

And many more…

Comments, and new followers

Sorry. It’s another of those posts about more annoying trends in blog comments, and new ‘followers’.

Over the weekend, I was pleased to attract quite a few new followers to this blog. However, most of them had no linked blog themselves, or just the ubiquitous blank page. I have given up wondering why they do this, or seeking to offer them advice on not doing it, and have concluded that they are just Spammers, by other means.

Along with these, I did get a few genuine followers too. Bloggers with new sites that already included content, and some with well-established sites that were undoubtedly active. I was grateful to them, and left comments on their blog posts in return, as well as my thanks to them, for following my humble blog.

This weekend also saw the proliferation of a new ‘trick’, one that has been growing steadily over the past few weeks. Comments left for approval, sometimes at random, often by those same non-existent followers. They are easy to spot, as they contain few words. Comments such as “I like this”, “Nice post”, or the familiar “Thanks for sharing”. A few were just one word, such as “Good”, or “Thanks”. Most of these shallow comments were on the latest post I had published, each day. Annoyingly, they also contained links to business sites, or led directly to the blog of the sender, usually to a post telling me how great they were. Naturally, I didn’t fall for this, instead I became increasingly annoyed at both the subterfuge, and the presumption.

So, this post is directed at those people, and the hundreds more convinced that doing the same thing is going to drive their blog traffic, and attract millions of followers.

Don’t do it.
It is not working, and is not going to work.
Nobody is fooled.
You are just annoying, and your comments will be marked as Spam, or trashed.

Trying to promote your business by using my blog is unacceptable.
I will publicise your usernames, and advise everyone to ignore you.
This is NOT blogging, and is not wanted by genuine bloggers.

Here endeth today’s rant.

To those of you that were genuine, I once again say “Thank You”.