The Lakes: The Bowderstone

Photos from the 2016 trip to to the Lake District. This time, they are of a very unusual tourist attraction, not a lake. Please enlarge the photos from the original post, if you are able to.

beetleypete

All photos are large files and can be clicked on for detail

After the exertions of Monday, Antony promised me a much easier day to follow. In reasonable weather, we headed off on the drive to Buttermere, one of the smaller lakes in the area. On the way, he suggested a stop at The Bowderstone, in the Borrowdale Valley.
A gentle walk of about ten minutes from the car park took us to the site.
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This huge rock is believed to have fallen from the crag above, perhaps thousands of years ago, and it is unusual in that it came to rest on its edge, and has not moved since. Now managed by the National Trust, it was one of the first tourist attractions originally promoted in the area. In 1798, Joseph Pocklington publicised the stone as a tourist site, and employed an old woman to act as a guideā€¦

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The Lakes: The Bowderstone

All photos are large files and can be clicked on for detail

After the exertions of Monday, Antony promised me a much easier day to follow. In reasonable weather, we headed off on the drive to Buttermere, one of the smaller lakes in the area. On the way, he suggested a stop at The Bowderstone, in the Borrowdale Valley.
A gentle walk of about ten minutes from the car park took us to the site.
dscf0357

This huge rock is believed to have fallen from the crag above, perhaps thousands of years ago, and it is unusual in that it came to rest on its edge, and has not moved since. Now managed by the National Trust, it was one of the first tourist attractions originally promoted in the area. In 1798, Joseph Pocklington publicised the stone as a tourist site, and employed an old woman to act as a guide. He even built a cottage for her next to the stone, which still stands.
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During the day, she would sit inside the stone, telling improbable tales to the travellers who had come to see this natural phenomenon. Her spot is clearly visible, in the overhang to the right. You can also see the gate leading to her cottage, on the bottom left of the photo.
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To give some idea of how big it is, I walked up the ladder and took this shot looking back down it. Ollie can be seen at the bottom. He was crying, because he had tried to follow me, and was afraid to walk on the wide treads.
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It was impressive indeed, and in an idyllic setting too. The perfect start to our day, as we continued on to Buttermere.