Outside: Part Twenty-Three

This is the twenty-third part of a fiction serial, in 763 words.

When the reply came back from Charlotte, Gillian was not best pleased.

Dear Gill. You are very kind to offer me to come and live in your house, but I couldn’t possibly do that. Not only could I not face travelling to where you live, I would be ashamed to let you pay for everything, and just cannot let you do that. But your offer proves that you are a lovely person with a great heart, and I am so happy that we are friends. Love, Charlie. xx

That wasn’t very grateful. After all, she had offered to send a taxi, and she didn’t even know how far away Charlotte lived. Not that it bothered her to live alone. Unless she could have got mum back, she was better off being on her own, with nobody to answer to. For all she knew, Charlotte wouldn’t like the same kind of films, or what she cooked for dinner. Oh well, up to her if she wanted to miss out.

Checking the blog, Gillian was surprised to see a new follower, and a nice message.

StephaniesWorld.

Hi there. I am pleased to have come across your blog. Nobody understands why I don’t want to go out, not even my mum and dad. I tell them I am happy at home, but they say I can’t be, and I should have friends, and be outside enjoying life. They just don’t get it, and my mum says I will have to get a job soon so have to go out. I wish I could run away, but that would mean going outside. Everything seems so big and noisy. Traffic goes by so fast, and people walk around at such speed too. I haven’t been out for almost five years now, and hope I never have to. I am going to follow your blog, so you can call me Steff.

Not really knowing how to reply to that, Gillian clicked ‘Like’ on the comment, then went into the kichen to toast some waffles.

Thomas Halloran was making his preparations. He had arranged a hire car, as using his own van would not do. The choice was a boring two-door hatchback. A basic model in white that was the same as a million others on the road. Informing the company that he might need it for a few months, he had been asked to pay a deposit and leave card details for any additional charges. Essential items like toiletries and some clothes to change into had been packed into a holdall, along with some other items already kept in there. In a car accessory shop, he had bought a yellow hi-vis gilet, the sort worn by road repair workers. Paying in cash of course.

Driving the exceedingly dull small car to a large supermarket on the outskirts of the city, he purchased his favourite brand of tea bags and instant coffee, a packet of real butter, and some granary bread. Then making his first-ever trip along the confectionery aisle, he added a large box of expensive Belgian truffles.

Those waffles had been delicous with some raspberry syrup, and she had to stop herself having more by settling down to watch a film. A quick look through the newer DVD selections had her choosing something a bit different. She liked Tom Hanks in the film Big, so had bought a more recent one, called Forrest Gump.

The drive of sixty miles would only take just over ninety minutes, Thomas estimated. But as he wanted to arrive just before it was getting dark, he decided to drive to a nearby shopping complex and have a long lunch in a chain pub that was popular with families. They were open all day now, so closing times were no longer an issue.

By the time Thomas had eaten, and was driving to the junction where he could join the A1 heading south, Gillian had turned off the film before it finished. She had found it confusing, and rather silly. And she also thought it wasn’t nice to make fun of a young man who was obviously a bit slow in the head. She decided to have a nice long bath instead, and would think about what to cook for dinner while she was soaking herself.

In a side street five minute’s walk from Gillian’s house, Thomas parked the car, making sure it was in nobody’s way, not obstructing a drive or entrance, and legally parked in an area with no lines or restrictions.

It was going to be there for some time.

41 thoughts on “Outside: Part Twenty-Three

  1. (1) I’m grateful for subways. That’s why I enjoy a particular scene in “The Seven Year Itch.” (Although, film censors prevented it from being visually wilder.)
    (2) Bad citation: “Not that it bothered her to live alone. Unless she could have got the mummy back, she was better off being on her own.” (Meela Nais, referring to Imhotep)
    (3) “Steff hasn’t been outside in five years. That’s really SAD!” (Sarah Tonan)
    (4) “Everything seems so big and noisy. Traffic goes by so fast, and people walk around at such speed too.” I haven’t seen “Babe: Pig in the City,” but now I’m intrigued!
    (5) I haven’t quite figured out the meaning of “toileries,” but I’m working on it.
    (6) No mention of the make of the exceedingly dull small car, but it’s obviously not a fancy Smart car.
    (7) Bad citation: “Mum always said life was like a box of chocolate truffles. You never know what you’re gonna get.”
    (8) Overheard at a chain pub:
    Waitress: “Are you done with your third meal, Tommy?”
    Tommy: “Yes, I am.”
    Waitress: “Time to order your fourth meal then.”
    (9) As Gillian soaked in the tub, the bar of soap in her hand suggested what she could cook for dinner. “Gazpacho! A nice Spanish sopa!”

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