Woman trampled to death by cows

The cow attacks continue, and this time end in a tragic death. And people laugh at me when I say cows are dangerous.

Killer Cows

It is always heartbreaking to report another death. This time, a 55-year-old woman has died after being trampled by cattle at a farm in Sussex.


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56 thoughts on “Woman trampled to death by cows

    1. Probably not angry, just territorial and possibly protecting calves. These attacks are very frequent in Britain, Jennie. Fortunately, deaths are rare, but serious injury often occurs.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It is mostly ignored by the media here over here, Susanne. But serious incidents with cows happen every day in Britain, and even when someone is killed by cows, it is classed as ‘accidental’. I do not think that is good enough, and we need stronger laws and harsh penalties for farmers.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It needs to be better publicised. People are intimidated, chased, and injured by cows on a daily basis in the UK. On the rare occasions when someone is killed, it is classed as an ‘accident’. I don’t think that is acceptable, and I believe the farmers concerned should be held to account.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Very sad. I was just telling a friend of mine cows don’t do that when he told me about how he got charged at and trampled into a ditch in a field in Norfolk the other week when away camping, that it was almost certainly a bull that went for him rather than a cow ( he wasn’t;’t able to tell the difference). Bulls are notorious for it because they are territorial. I hadn’t heard of cows doing this before.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Bulls loose in fields are rare, so it could have been a cow. If you look at the website I reblogged from, you will see that cow attacks are frequent, and often very serious.
      Best wishes, Pete.

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    1. Fenced pastures are fine, and can be avoided, Dorothy. But so many farmers in the UK graze cows on land that also has public footpaths, with no fences. Those areas are where most people get hurt.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. If the cows are in a field you can avoid them, but here they’re allowed to graze all over the place in summer. There have been a number of incidents with people getting chased and injured, even people without dogs who’ve minding their own business and keeping well away – they’ll run quite a long way if they spot you in the distance and think you’re worth chasing. It’s hard to avoid them as they seem to be everywhere. It completely ruins dog walks for me in the summer as I’m scared every time I go out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are right to be scared, Annabelle. Things are getting worse everywhere, with many farmers openly grazing cattle on unfenced public footpath areas and not putting up any warning signs. By the time you see the herd, it can be too late.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Cattle graze here in fields where public footpaths pass through, including St Michael’s Way which is a pilgrim route. Often a bull, cows and calves and extremely inquisitive and boisterous bullocks. We always avoid them.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Me too – think cows can be dangerous when they feel vulnerable or threatened, But then I’m easily scared by sheep! We humans shouldn’t go around the countryside in an entitled way, making these herd animals nervous. A seminal childhood experience was being chased round a pond in Richmond Park by a stag!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. As a kid I was terrified of cows and was always considered “silly”. Some cows crashed through a hedge once after my aunt’s Jack Russel barked at them. I don’t think they are normally aggressive but will certainly be defensive. I believe one should respect any animal that size.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I remember the day I was totally surrounded by a group of wild horses. And then I ran out of carrots to feed them. I wasn’t sure what the horses would do. But after a bit, they began to disperse. I learned a lesson that day. Don’t horse around with wild animals. Something bad could happen!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. That sounds horrible, Pete. When my grandparents had dairy cows, I remember them often kicking while being milked – and they could do some real damage. They are powerful animals.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Cows are not the gentle animals lots of people think they are. Iโ€™ve heard of cows trampling us little humans too often. Once, when out walking with a rollator (wheeled walking frame), a herd of cows got spooked at the rattle it made. We were on a footpath, and first one cow, then soon, the whole herd had us surrounded. We had to move slowly, carefully, and as quietly as possible. I admit to feeling quite terrified until we got out of that field, and it took us a while, seeing as we had to just about tip-toe out of there. We need more warnings about cows, never mind just the bulls. Thanks for sharing, Pete ๐Ÿ™‚๐Ÿ’•

    Liked by 1 person

  9. When we walk along the Tennyson Trail on the IOW there are always a herd of cows to negotiate, and sometimes a bull. We always give them a wide berth, particularly if they have calves with them, but they seem quite used to people.

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Hundreds of people walk that trail every day. The cattle are all rather passive and never bother anybody. There’s a sign not to get between the mothers and babies, and people don’t. They leave us alone and we leave them alone.

        Liked by 2 people

          1. The herd has been on the cliffs for years, and people pass them all the time, some with dogs running about. Sometimes the cows stand right in the footpath and you have to skirt around them. They’ve never shown the slightest bit of aggression.

            Liked by 2 people

  10. One of my grammar school masters used to call us “bovine creatures” when we displeased him [much of the time, truth to tell ๐Ÿ˜‰ ] but he wasn’t meaning that we could be dangerous! Cheers, Jon.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Concur Pete, not so common in NZ, despite dairy a major export from here, but I have been to 2 (fatalities).
    Dairy workers here tend to stay on their quad bikes, always behind the herd & have a hosepipe in their hand at all times.
    If visiting a farm or a stranger near some cows, I recommend a wide berth!
    https://www.worksafe.govt.nz/topic-and-industry/agriculture/working-with-animals/working-with-cattle/safe-cattle-handling-guide/#:~:text=If%20you%20have%20to%20catch,the%20dogs%20are%20well%20trained.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is so much more common that people know, Beth. Cow attacks are frequent in Britain, and sometimes result in serious injury or death. Too many farmers graze herds near public footpaths, and there are not enough signs to warn walkers that cows are in the area. The Killer Cows blog tries to warn people, and you can see from the archives that there are many dangerous occurences involving cows here.
      They can also run at 28 mph, faster than most top atheletes.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Apparently so, and the cows were near a footpath. I avoid cows at all costs, whether I am with Ollie or not. Ever since I moved to the countryside, I have often been ‘intimidated’ by cows, and on one occasion I was chased to the gate at Hoe Rough by half a dozen cows. I follow the Killer Cows blog and attacks by cows are very frequent all over Britain.
      Best wishes, Pete.

      Liked by 3 people

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